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with a mist like this

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15:08 Jul 23, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: with a mist like this
“We’d better find them, if we’re going to get into the valley,” said Glorina.
“But with a mist like this, there’s no chance to find them.”

Dear native English speakers!
Please advise if the phrase sounds okay to you or if I should change it. 'IN a mist like this', maybe?
The characters are surrounded by a thick mist which makes their search difficult, if possible at all.
Thank you.
P.S.Translated from Russian.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 08:39
English translation:two comments
Explanation:
1 - could mist be substituted for fog? Or is it definitely mist? Fog is a lot thicker and works better in literature.
2 - perhaps its would read better as "in such a mist/fog" and it would best to turn the sentence around (IMO) to "there's no chance of finding them in this fog' or "we'd be lucky to find them under this thick fog".
Just a few suggestions :-)
Selected response from:

Aisha Maniar
Local time: 02:39
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments Aisha! Thanks everybody!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9two comments
Aisha Maniar
4 +6It's OK
Tony M
3 +2in mist as thick as this
Nick Lingris
4in a mist like this
JaneTranslates
3 +1in such mist
Vicky Papaprodromou


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
in a mist like this


Explanation:
Your "with a mist" sounds OK, but I definitely prefer "in."

JaneTranslates
Puerto Rico
Local time: 21:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
in mist as thick as this


Explanation:
More poetic.
Alternatively:
In this kind of mist
In this thick mist


Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Yes, that's right: "in mist"; not "in/with A mist".
33 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  xxxcmwilliams: and 'no chance/hope of finding them'
44 mins
  -> Thanks. Must admit I didn't pay much attention to the rest of the sentence.
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
two comments


Explanation:
1 - could mist be substituted for fog? Or is it definitely mist? Fog is a lot thicker and works better in literature.
2 - perhaps its would read better as "in such a mist/fog" and it would best to turn the sentence around (IMO) to "there's no chance of finding them in this fog' or "we'd be lucky to find them under this thick fog".
Just a few suggestions :-)

Aisha Maniar
Local time: 02:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments Aisha! Thanks everybody!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: my thoughts exactly :-)
0 min
  -> cheers Rita :-)

agree  xxxsarahl
2 mins
  -> cheers :-)

agree  Sonia Geerlings: or for the end of the sentence: "..we've got no hope of finding them"
6 mins
  -> yes, that's also a good suggestion :-)

agree  Ulrike Kraemer
7 mins
  -> cheers :-)

neutral  Bianca AH: I prefer mist - I would associate fog with a town or city (although I realise this is probably not the case!)
10 mins
  -> well, we have more than our fair share of misty mornings here in London ;-)

agree  Asghar Bhatti: mist is more romantic.
39 mins
  -> it is indeed. Thank you :-)

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 hr
  -> thank you :-)

agree  jennifer newsome
3 hrs
  -> thank you :-)

agree  Johan Venter
15 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
15 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
in such mist


Explanation:
...And how do we proceed in such mist,
not for an hour, not for a day, but for a thousand years--
our contempt stuck in our pocket,
tet a tet with the cold wind?...
Thursday night (when dreams come true)--- LEV RUBINSHTEIN


...Two disappointments awaited me on entering the Heads of Port Phillip: first, it was early morn, just before daybreak, and next, when the day did develop upon us half-way up the Bay, it was in such mist and rain as all but deprived us of any view...
"Early Melbourne and Victoria" by William Westgarth
http://isis.library.adelaide.edu.au/cgi-bin/pg-html/pg/etext...


...There were few that failed to come safely through, for the most part of the Turkish fleet lay at anchor in Marsa Scirocco Bay, and even the lighter galleys, ever hunting for prey, were loth to venture far in such mist and in waters they did not know...
"The Siege Of Malta - Part I"
PART I - ST. ELMO by S. Fowler Wright








--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2005-07-23 15:26:53 GMT)
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The link to the last quotation: http://www.sfw.org/books/malta1.html

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Note added at 36 mins (2005-07-23 15:45:01 GMT)
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No need to mention that I disagree with the use of the article \"a\" more than the use of \"with\" in your original sentence, Andrew.:-)

Vicky Papaprodromou
Greece
Local time: 04:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nick Lingris: Oh well, the KIS principle again...
18 mins
  -> Thanks, Nick. We should follow it more often, shouldn't we?
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
It's OK


Explanation:
Actually, I don't find anything at all wrong with using 'with' in this way; it doesn't sound a bit odd to my ears!

However, what really DOES sound odd is "no chance to find them" --- that simply does NOT work! I'd change it just to "no chance of finding them"

I also have a niggling little doubt about that "if we're going to get into the valley" 'get' here sounds wrong, or at least, weak.

to reach...
to make it down into the valley
to find our way...

??

Tony M
France
Local time: 03:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 248

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Vicky!

agree  xxxcmwilliams: yes, the main problem is with the second part of the sentence
46 mins
  -> Thanks, CMW! Yes, I agree

agree  Susanne Rindlisbacher
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Susanne!

agree  Balasubramaniam L.
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Bala! :-)

agree  juvera: You are right, as usual.
17 hrs
  -> Thanks, Juvera! Most kind (though I wish it were true!)

agree  NancyLynn: agree with cmw
1 day6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nancy!
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