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her foot came upon something

English translation: her foot came upon something

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05:52 Jul 24, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: her foot came upon something
But she chose to go on as long as she could feel the firm road under her feet. She moved on, step by step, until her foot came upon something lying right on the road.

Dear native English speakers!
Please advise if it is okay to use 'came upon' talking about feet. Has it not been for the 'step by step' phrase, I would have used 'stepped upon' which is probably better here. But I have to find a substitution.
The context:
The character is going along the road carefully, for it is dark around her.
Thank you!
P.S. My translation from Russian, it is.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 15:05
English translation:her foot came upon something
Explanation:
With the context that she is going down a path very carefully I would say your translation is a very good one. The words are very powerful in setting the scene, so I wouldn't change a word.

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Note added at 5 hrs 56 mins (2005-07-24 11:48:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Google \"came upon\" and you will find endless references. Here are a few links taken from stories:

She had nearly emptied the box, when she came upon a small but heavy packet.
http://www3.shropshire-cc.gov.uk/etexts/E000109.htm

did you ever eat a
bat?\' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of
stick and dry leaves, and the fall was over.
http://ccooke.umcus.org/etext/alice13a.txt


Selected response from:

Johan Venter
Czech Republic
Local time: 10:05
Grading comment
Thank you very much indeed for your support! And yes, it was not as big as a dead camel (please see my note).
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +8she stumbled across something lying on the road
Margaret Lagoyianni
3 +2without "right"Bianca AH
4her foot up came up against something lying in the middle of the road
Rachel Fell
4her foot came upon something
Johan Venter
4until she trod upon
Balasubramaniam L.
4nudged against
jerrie


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
until she trod upon


Explanation:
She moved on, step by step, until she trod upon something lying right on the road.


Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 13:35
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Personally, whatever the verb used, I would avoid 'upon', which sounds quaintly formal or old-fashioned. 'Trod on' is Ok if it is something small, but from the context given, for all we know, it might be a dead camel!
2 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
nudged against


Explanation:
made contact with

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 96
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
she stumbled across something lying on the road


Explanation:
the meaning being that she found by chance. This encompasses the meaning of darkness which you wish to convey.

Margaret Lagoyianni
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:05

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
12 mins
  -> Thx

agree  Aisha Maniar: yes and I would also say...until she could feel the road firmly under her feet (in the 1st sentence)
1 hr
  -> Thx

agree  Robert Donahue
2 hrs
  -> Thx

disagree  Johan Venter: Stubled across sounds to me like she fell over whatever she found. This does not seem to be the case here.
2 hrs
  -> Oxford dict. gives 'find by chance' or 'find unexpectedly'

agree  Gareth McMillan: Stumbled "on", surely if it's figurative.
3 hrs
  -> Yes. This would be an acceptable alternative as would 'stumble upon'.

agree  Nick Lingris
3 hrs

agree  Tony M: Yes, this could work fine, AS LONG AS it's a relatively bulky object... It would sound odd for a small thing...
4 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
6 hrs

agree  Scheherezade Suria Lopez
23 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 day1 hr
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
her foot came upon something


Explanation:
With the context that she is going down a path very carefully I would say your translation is a very good one. The words are very powerful in setting the scene, so I wouldn't change a word.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 56 mins (2005-07-24 11:48:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Google \"came upon\" and you will find endless references. Here are a few links taken from stories:

She had nearly emptied the box, when she came upon a small but heavy packet.
http://www3.shropshire-cc.gov.uk/etexts/E000109.htm

did you ever eat a
bat?\' when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of
stick and dry leaves, and the fall was over.
http://ccooke.umcus.org/etext/alice13a.txt




Johan Venter
Czech Republic
Local time: 10:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you very much indeed for your support! And yes, it was not as big as a dead camel (please see my note).

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Your ref. #1 is as I say 'SHE came upon', which is fine (but NOT 'her FOOT came upon'); #2 is in fact the verb 'came down' preposition 'upon', not at all the same thing... / Yes, 'felt sth under her foot' would be fine, again ASSUMING it is that small..
2 hrs
  -> Perhaps your English is different from mine then, Dusty, but upon sounds good to me here. One can also say that she **felt** something under her foot. I assume it is not as big as a dead camel if she felt it under her foot.
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
without "right"


Explanation:
I agree with venter in saying that your sentence works. Because the character is moving "step by step" the reader is "focused" on the foot, so "foot" works well here.

My recommendation is to remove "right" making the sentence: "...until her foot came upon something lying on the road".

Bianca AH
France
Local time: 10:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mportal: unless she tripped up or stumbled, which it doesn't say in the text, this sounds fine
43 mins
  -> Thanks, mportal

agree  Johan Venter: It could work well without right as well. Thank you also for indicating that you agree with me in your answer.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, venter (and it's a pleasure :))
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2 days16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
her foot up came up against something lying in the middle of the road


Explanation:
Sorry, Andrew, I know it's closed, but saw this and "to come upon" basically means "to find" - a foot can't really find something here (in the second example cited for "to come upon" it's actually "came down upon" but in a different order)
P.S. It's not about getting points but I have to put a level in!

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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