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toidy-toid and toid

English translation: Thirty-third and Third Avenue (New York)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:toidy-toid and toid (New York accent)
English translation:Thirty-third and Third Avenue (New York)
Entered by: María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Options:
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17:46 Aug 26, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Region (source): English (United States)
Region (target): English (United States)
English term or phrase: toidy-toid and toid
I'm reading a Nelson DeMille novel about a New York policeman who is recovering from gunshot wounds on the North Fork of Long Island.

This passage describes how John, the cop, is riding in a car with another cop, a woman, who is driving.

Suddenly, the woman says, apropos of nothing:

-We're approaching toidy-toid and toid.

And the cop responds:

-I do *not* speak with that kind of accent. I do *not* find that amusing.

-I hear ya.

By the way, this cop is kind of a joker (I love DeMille's characters, they're always fun to "get to know").

I suppose she's making fun of his NY accent, and the only thing I can think of it's that it means "thirty-third", but I'd like to be sure.

Thanks!
María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Panama
Local time: 22:49
Thirty-third and Third Avenue
Explanation:
Yes, you're right. It's a Brooklyn accent.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-08-26 17:57:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I stand corrected:
---
New Yorkers have the Irish to thank for their now famous "toity-toid ohn toid". A Hofstra University professor, Francis Griffith, attributes New Yorkese speakers' habit of interchanging the diphthong "oi" with "er" to Gaelic language.
The general notion is that each borough has a distinct accent. This would mean that there is a Brooklyn accent, as opposed to Bronx accent; and that there is a Manhattan, a Queens and a Staten Island accent.

This means that there is no such thing as Bronx accent or a Brooklyn accent. The variations in New York accent is actually more a result of the ethnic roots of the waves of immigrants that settled in the city, starting with the Dutch, the Irish, the Italian and the European Jews . All these influences ganged up and gave New York its distinctive accent. So New Yorkese speakers either have an Italian-American, Irish-American or Yiddish-American accent.

http://www.nyc24.org/2003/issue3/story5/page2.html
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 22:49
Grading comment
Oh my God, I'm so sorry, I'd forgotten I had this question open!! Thank you all for you excellent answers and references!! :) By the way, this is the first question I grade while using the new layout, so I apologize in advance if I do something wrong!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +21Thirty-third and Third Avenue
Kim Metzger
5 +933rd and 3rdxxxtazdog
4 +2intersection of Thirty-third and Third streets
Anne Spitzmueller


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
33rd and 3rd


Explanation:
That's what it means.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-08-26 17:55:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OT: See ADS-L archives for "Thirty-Third and Third" or "toidy toid 'n toid"--ed.):
http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0406C&L=ad...

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 05:49
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Enza Longo
7 mins

agree  Rachel Fell
23 mins

agree  sporran
1 hr

agree  Elizabeth Lyons
7 hrs

agree  Robert Donahue
7 hrs

agree  KathyT
12 hrs

agree  Saiwai Translation Services
15 hrs

agree  Amy Williams
19 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: -
2 days12 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +21
Thirty-third and Third Avenue


Explanation:
Yes, you're right. It's a Brooklyn accent.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-08-26 17:57:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I stand corrected:
---
New Yorkers have the Irish to thank for their now famous "toity-toid ohn toid". A Hofstra University professor, Francis Griffith, attributes New Yorkese speakers' habit of interchanging the diphthong "oi" with "er" to Gaelic language.
The general notion is that each borough has a distinct accent. This would mean that there is a Brooklyn accent, as opposed to Bronx accent; and that there is a Manhattan, a Queens and a Staten Island accent.

This means that there is no such thing as Bronx accent or a Brooklyn accent. The variations in New York accent is actually more a result of the ethnic roots of the waves of immigrants that settled in the city, starting with the Dutch, the Irish, the Italian and the European Jews . All these influences ganged up and gave New York its distinctive accent. So New Yorkese speakers either have an Italian-American, Irish-American or Yiddish-American accent.

http://www.nyc24.org/2003/issue3/story5/page2.html


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 22:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 277
Grading comment
Oh my God, I'm so sorry, I'd forgotten I had this question open!! Thank you all for you excellent answers and references!! :) By the way, this is the first question I grade while using the new layout, so I apologize in advance if I do something wrong!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nick Lingris
2 mins

agree  JaneTranslates
5 mins

agree  Enza Longo
8 mins

agree  Refugio: The oi may be Irish but the th to t conversion is more Yiddish or Italian. Truly an amalgam there in Brooklyn.
17 mins

agree  xxxgtreyger
18 mins

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
34 mins

agree  sporran
1 hr

agree  jennifer newsome
1 hr

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 hr

agree  jccantrell: Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk, spread out! Watch out for the fingers in the eyes from Moe of the Three Stooges!
3 hrs
  -> I guess the only kids who know about my favorite boys are the ones who studied ancient history.

agree  JCEC
5 hrs

agree  Elizabeth Lyons: This was a good one. It is also very close to a Jersey City accent.
7 hrs

agree  Robert Donahue
7 hrs

agree  Nanny Wintjens
7 hrs

agree  ahmadwadan.com
11 hrs

agree  KathyT
12 hrs

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
14 hrs

agree  Saiwai Translation Services
15 hrs

agree  Amy Williams
19 hrs

agree  bigedsenior: It is also heard in the Bronx.
22 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: -
2 days12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
intersection of Thirty-third and Third streets


Explanation:
intersection of Thirty-third and Third streets

Back at that Brooklyn accent, the standard example is the pronunciation "Toidy- Toid and Toid" for the intersection of Thirty-third and Third streets. In truth, this particular "sound" is nearly extinct in New York. This sort of speech was so mercilessly parodied in movies, radio and TV that it came to be stigmatized as a badge of low breeding and lack of sophistication. Ironically, in an attempt to correct their pronunciation of "oi" in phrases like "Toidy-toid," many New Yorkers carried the process too far (a process linguists call "hypercorrection"). Today it's common to hear Brooklynites pronounce the word "toilet" as "terlet," and while you Bostonians may "boil" an egg, in Brooklyn they "berl" it.




    Reference: http://www.word-detective.com/back-m.html
Anne Spitzmueller
Germany
Local time: 05:49
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov
7 mins
  -> Spassibo, bolschoje! :-)

neutral  Can Altinbay: Not quite. 33rd street and 3rd avenue.
34 mins
  -> right, Can ;-)

agree  airmailrpl: 33rd street and 3rd avenue
2 days12 hrs
  -> thanks :-)
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