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The devil you say!

English translation: expression uttered in surprise or disbelief = No kidding! or Is that a fact?

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:The devil you say!
English translation:expression uttered in surprise or disbelief = No kidding! or Is that a fact?
Entered by: xxxOso
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18:57 Sep 6, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / From a fantasy novel
English term or phrase: The devil you say!
[One man says to the other:
'There's been a murder.'
The other says:
'The devil you say! Who's the victim?'
'N.'
The second man was incredulous.]

Is this just an exclamation of surprise?
Alexander Alexandrov
Russian Federation
Local time: 03:38
expression uttered in surprise or disbelief = No kidding! or Is that a fact?
Explanation:
"The deuce you say!

I have heard this expression uttered in surprise or disbelief, often from my British friends but I haven't a clue as to its origin. Can anyone shed some light on where this originated?


Submitted by Greg Cholmondeley (Boca Raton - U.S.A. )
------------------------------------------------------------

Deuce is sometimes substituted for "devil" so this phrase is really a variation of "The devil you say!"

Response from Russ Cable (Dallas, TX - U.S.A.)
------------------------------------------------------------

Greg, The word ‘deuce’ is a euphemism for the devil and dates back to the late 17th century (the similarly used ‘dickens’ dates from the late 16th century) and has been used in oaths, especially, ‘what (who, why, etc.) the duece,’ usually expressing impatience or irritation, and in ‘ the deuce to pay.’ ‘Deuce’ derives from Low German ‘duus,’ and probably from the sense ‘a throw of two at dice (the lowest-scoring throw with two dice), and hence denoting the embodiment of bad luck. It was used as a mild substitution for devil back when it was considered profane to speak the name.

I’m not sure when ‘the deuce you say’ first appeared, but the following is an example used by Dumas in his ‘Count of Monte Cristo’ (1844), Chapter 9: “Then give me a letter to him, and tell him to sell out without an instant's delay, perhaps even now I shall arrive too late." “The deuce you say!" replied the marquis, "let us lose no time, then!

From what I can gather from the Google contexts in which it appears, ‘the deuce (devil) you say’ means ‘really’ or ‘you’re kidding me (or no kidding),’ or ‘is that a fact?’


A refrigerator magnet distributed at the 2004 “Sound Of The Baskervilles' Master’s Dinner” read: “Watson, I'm afraid I'm 150 this year." "The deuce, you say, Holmes! Why you scarcely look 100!!"


(Oxford Dictionary of Slang) "

Good luck from Oso ¶:^)
Selected response from:

xxxOso
Grading comment
Thank you very much, dear Oso!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +12expression uttered in surprise or disbelief = No kidding! or Is that a fact?xxxOso
4 +5Never, I don't believe you!Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
4 +2an exclamation of surprise at the dreadfull conditions of the crime
Clauwolf


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the devil you say!
Never, I don't believe you!


Explanation:
This is what it means.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-09-06 19:09:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also: that can't be possible/true!

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 01:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flipendo
41 mins

agree  Rachel Fell
41 mins

agree  Charlie Bavington
52 mins

agree  John Bowden: That's what it means - but it's archaic now, and would only be found in 19th/early 20th century novels etc., unless for comic effect.
2 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
21 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
the devil you say!
an exclamation of surprise at the dreadfull conditions of the crime


Explanation:
:)

Clauwolf
Local time: 20:38
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flipendo
40 mins
  -> thanks

agree  zaphod: You got it first
12 hrs
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
expression uttered in surprise or disbelief = No kidding! or Is that a fact?


Explanation:
"The deuce you say!

I have heard this expression uttered in surprise or disbelief, often from my British friends but I haven't a clue as to its origin. Can anyone shed some light on where this originated?


Submitted by Greg Cholmondeley (Boca Raton - U.S.A. )
------------------------------------------------------------

Deuce is sometimes substituted for "devil" so this phrase is really a variation of "The devil you say!"

Response from Russ Cable (Dallas, TX - U.S.A.)
------------------------------------------------------------

Greg, The word ‘deuce’ is a euphemism for the devil and dates back to the late 17th century (the similarly used ‘dickens’ dates from the late 16th century) and has been used in oaths, especially, ‘what (who, why, etc.) the duece,’ usually expressing impatience or irritation, and in ‘ the deuce to pay.’ ‘Deuce’ derives from Low German ‘duus,’ and probably from the sense ‘a throw of two at dice (the lowest-scoring throw with two dice), and hence denoting the embodiment of bad luck. It was used as a mild substitution for devil back when it was considered profane to speak the name.

I’m not sure when ‘the deuce you say’ first appeared, but the following is an example used by Dumas in his ‘Count of Monte Cristo’ (1844), Chapter 9: “Then give me a letter to him, and tell him to sell out without an instant's delay, perhaps even now I shall arrive too late." “The deuce you say!" replied the marquis, "let us lose no time, then!

From what I can gather from the Google contexts in which it appears, ‘the deuce (devil) you say’ means ‘really’ or ‘you’re kidding me (or no kidding),’ or ‘is that a fact?’


A refrigerator magnet distributed at the 2004 “Sound Of The Baskervilles' Master’s Dinner” read: “Watson, I'm afraid I'm 150 this year." "The deuce, you say, Holmes! Why you scarcely look 100!!"


(Oxford Dictionary of Slang) "

Good luck from Oso ¶:^)


    Reference: http://wordwizard.com/clubhouse/founddiscuss1.asp?Num=5920
xxxOso
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you very much, dear Oso!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joanna Borowska: found the same link!
5 mins
  -> Thank you, ryfka ¶:^)

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Woohoo!! Another language URL to add to my favorites!! :P Hellow and thankees, dear bear :O)
11 mins
  -> Gracias a ti MariTere ¶:) Thank you and hugz! ¶:^)

agree  Sara Noss: "Sound of the Baskervilles", I like that & agree with your answer too. ;)
22 mins
  -> Thank you, Babayaga! ¶:^)

agree  flipendo
35 mins
  -> Thank you, flipendo ¶:^)

agree  Rachel Fell
36 mins
  -> Thank you, Rachel ¶:^)

agree  Refugio
39 mins
  -> Thank you/Mil gracias Ruth! ¶:^)

agree  sporran
43 mins
  -> Thank you, sporran ¶:^)

agree  humbird: Definitely a BE. Not hear often in AE environment.
1 hr
  -> Thank you, humbird ¶:^)

agree  jccantrell: Actually used in AE, but looooong ago.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, jccantrell ¶:^)

agree  jennifer newsome
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, jennifer ¶:^)

agree  xxxgtreyger
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Gennadiy ¶:^)

agree  Andrey Belousov
7 hrs
  -> Thank you, Andrey ¶:^)
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