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the sound of a button being torn off

English translation: rripp!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:the sound of a button being torn off
English translation:rripp!
Entered by: Andrew Vdovin
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09:51 Sep 1, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: the sound of a button being torn off
Dear native English speakers!
How would you describe phonetically the sound of a button being torn off by someone deliberately? Could it be 'crack!' or something of the kind?

The context:
Crack! - and his button was in my hand.

Thank you.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 03:29
rripp!
Explanation:
Just a variant to capture a bit of the action that goes into ripping it off, if that takes any effort at all. It doesn't suggest the cloth is being ripped, just the thread.

You see this sort of spelling now and then, with extra letters.

The most noise wd be made by the sucking of air caused by the lifting and falling of the cloth as the threads are broken (one thread in many windings)-- that would be 'Pop'! One thread alone tied to a hard and unyielding surface -- 'snap'!

Otherwise, Pop! is pretty close.
Selected response from:

Anton Baer
Slovakia
Local time: 22:29
Grading comment
I think I'll use this one. Thank you very much for your help guys!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7snapxxxCMJ_Trans
3 +5Pop!
Caryl Swift
3 +2another two bits (not for points)Ken Cox
3 +1A sharp ripping sound
Mark Nathan
4ttaakkk!!
Rachel Fell
3rripp!
Anton Baer


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
snap


Explanation:
the snap of the thread breaking

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 22:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Suzan Hamer: If a button being ripped off produces any sort of sound at all, the snap of breaking thread would be as good a description as any. Of course, there's always "ping" which might be a little softer than "snap" :) /Agree with Kenneth: why is sound impt.?
9 mins

agree  Dave Calderhead
19 mins

agree  Rachel Nkere-Uwem
1 hr

agree  Mark Nathan
1 hr

agree  jccantrell: This is alos good. Either this or pop.
4 hrs

agree  Ken Cox: Based on Andrew's subsequent info, you could say '(with a quick jerk,) X snapped a button off Y's jacket'. Who cares what sound it made?
4 hrs

neutral  Refugio: Snap! is a sharper sound than a button makes when torn off.
5 hrs

agree  conejo: Hmm, this is a hard question. I am not sure if I 100% agree with any of the suggestions, but I can't come up with anything better...probably 'snap' would be the best.
6 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
20 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
A sharp ripping sound


Explanation:
A sharp ripping sound - and his button was in my hand.

I don't think there is an appropriate phonetic description - buttons "pop" but that is when you are too fat and they pop open, it is not the sound of them being ripped off!


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2006-09-01 10:08:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You could just say, "Rip! - and the button....

But in my experience this "phonetic style" is usually reserved for comic strips (kapow , zap, bam etc)

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 22:29
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Suzan Hamer: Again, unless a good deal of cloth around the button was also ripped off, I'm not sure there would be any sound at all.
9 mins

agree  Refugio: I would say "Rrip!"
5 hrs
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
another two bits (not for points)


Explanation:
I agree with Suzan's comments (among others). The sound depends very much on the individual situation -- does the thread break or does the fabric rip, how big is the button, what type of cloth is it, how violently it is torn off, etc. Also in line with other answers and comments, this would normally be handled in English by phrasing such as ''the button came loose with a sharp sound of ripping fabric', 'the button came loose with a tiny snap of breaking thread', etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-09-01 10:52:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, if you're writing for children or prefer a dramatic style, you could follow Mark's suggestions.

Ken Cox
Local time: 22:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Caryl Swift: That's exactly why I posted the question about the mood of the moment being described :-)
19 mins

agree  Asghar Bhatti
1 hr
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Pop!


Explanation:
Another suggestion - kind of onomatopoeic and also has a sense of movement to it - the button pops off in his hand :-)

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 22:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jccantrell: My first thought.
33 mins
  -> Thank you ! :-)

agree  Ken Cox: You could also say that 'X popped a button off the jacket of Y'. (perhaps not especially common usage, but certainly understandable) IMO that would be gentler than snapping off a button.
1 hr
  -> Thank you ! :-)

agree  Anton Baer: Better than snap.
1 hr
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Suzan Hamer: Yes, it could be soft pop. Isn't this a fascinating profession? We all stop working to find the perfect word to describe an event which makes little if any sound. I like Caryl's idea of onomatopoeic movement.
6 hrs
  -> You're right about the profession-and I honestly think that many other people would think we're all quite mad!Well,good-better than 9-5'sanity' any day,in my book!Thank you,Suzan!:-)

agree  juvera
1 day2 hrs
  -> Thank you! :-)
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
rripp!


Explanation:
Just a variant to capture a bit of the action that goes into ripping it off, if that takes any effort at all. It doesn't suggest the cloth is being ripped, just the thread.

You see this sort of spelling now and then, with extra letters.

The most noise wd be made by the sucking of air caused by the lifting and falling of the cloth as the threads are broken (one thread in many windings)-- that would be 'Pop'! One thread alone tied to a hard and unyielding surface -- 'snap'!

Otherwise, Pop! is pretty close.


Anton Baer
Slovakia
Local time: 22:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
I think I'll use this one. Thank you very much for your help guys!
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
ttaakkk!!


Explanation:
seems more like a button coming off an oldish fabric jacket - there'll be more than one strand of thread involved, and a dullish sound

but with some description such as "....as the button..." ,etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2006-09-02 07:55:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or maybe ttssaakkk!


Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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