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across

English translation: on, at or from the other side of smth./sb. - more or less opposite smth./sb.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:across
English translation:on, at or from the other side of smth./sb. - more or less opposite smth./sb.
Entered by: Caryl Swift
Options:
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15:33 Mar 6, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: across
'she put fresh sheets on the bed in the room across the hall from mine'

sorry for the triviality of this question but this is a very telling sentence in the text I work on as the picking-up of a guest room showes the attitude of a servant towards her mistress and I would like to understand it clearly.

Was the room on the opposite end of the hall (then the servant liked her mistress) or just opposite the mistress's bedroom, on the other side of the hall (then the servant was malicious and put her mistresss in a very uncomfortable situation )?
mww
Local time: 20:03
on the other side of the hall - more or less opposite the mistress's bedroom
Explanation:
As in 'just across the road', meaning 'more or less opposite'

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Note added at 6 mins (2007-03-06 15:39:38 GMT)
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"a·cross (-krôs, -krs)
prep.
1. On, at, or from the other side of: across the street.

adv.

2. On or to the opposite side: We came across by ferry.
(From: http://tinyurl.com/35kr9o )
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
thnx:-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +10on the other side of the hall - more or less opposite the mistress's bedroom
Caryl Swift
4 +4on the other side of the hall
Anton Baer


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +10
on the other side of the hall - more or less opposite the mistress's bedroom


Explanation:
As in 'just across the road', meaning 'more or less opposite'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2007-03-06 15:39:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"a·cross (-krôs, -krs)
prep.
1. On, at, or from the other side of: across the street.

adv.

2. On or to the opposite side: We came across by ferry.
(From: http://tinyurl.com/35kr9o )

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 20:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 76
Grading comment
thnx:-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Demyanov
12 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
21 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d
27 mins
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  conejo
1 hr
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Ioanna Karamanou
1 hr
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Alison Jenner
1 hr
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro
2 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  Sophia Finos
4 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  kmtext
16 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 day4 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
on the other side of the hall


Explanation:
Why is it confusing? It's 'oproti', for sure.

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Note added at 25 mins (2007-03-06 15:58:37 GMT)
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If it were at the end of the hall, the prep. would be 'down' (or possibly 'up' the hall, depending on very specific history of usage -- as in uptown, downtown, which seems to depend on the history of a town and who says what first and thus establishes the precedent...).

Anton Baer
Slovakia
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: in English-Polish dictionaries "across" is explained in such a way it seems to concern the longer axis not the shorter one. My natural feeling was "on the other side" but I've consulted the dictionary to make sure and got confused:-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Demyanov
12 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
20 mins

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d: The same answer and equally good
27 mins

agree  conejo
1 hr
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