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passe superstition

English translation: outmoded/out-of-date superstition

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:passe superstition
English translation:outmoded/out-of-date superstition
Entered by: Kaysha
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

15:25 Apr 2, 2007
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: passe superstition
There is an 'acute accent' above the last 'e' in 'passe', which I did not know how to type in.

The sentence is:
The alchemical task of refinement has for centuries been relegated to the realms of passe superstition and kitsch illustration.

Can someone tell me what the writer means by 'passe superstition'?

From my basic knowledge of French, I am presuming that 'passe' is the past tense of 'to pass' therefore maybe meaning 'beyond superstition'. But not at all sure...
Kaysha
Canada
oumoded/out-of-date superstition
Explanation:
passé just means "behind the times" or "old fashioned"
Selected response from:

Patricia Rosas
United States
Local time: 05:56
Grading comment
Thanks for such a speedy response!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7oumoded/out-of-date superstition
Patricia Rosas
4 +6out of fashion/date superstition
Mark Nathan
3 +6outdated superstition
Lars Helbig
2 +6old-fashioned superstition
Rolf Klischewski, M.A.
5 -2Last/past/former/in days gone byAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
oumoded/out-of-date superstition


Explanation:
passé just means "behind the times" or "old fashioned"

Patricia Rosas
United States
Local time: 05:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thanks for such a speedy response!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.: Yup!
1 min
  -> thanks!

agree  Melzie
28 mins
  -> thank you!

agree  Tony M
58 mins
  -> thanks, too!

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: Absolutely!
2 hrs
  -> thanks!!

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: -
14 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
7 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
out of fashion/date superstition


Explanation:
passé as in "no longer current"

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 14:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rolf Klischewski, M.A.: Yup!
0 min

agree  Melzie
28 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
37 mins

agree  Tony M
58 mins

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: out of fashion
14 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +6
old-fashioned superstition


Explanation:
I'm not a French native either, but "passé" is used like that in German, so ... (C;

Rolf Klischewski, M.A.
Local time: 14:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Rosas: yup, too!
3 mins

agree  Melzie
32 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
37 mins

agree  Tony M
58 mins

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: -
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
outdated superstition


Explanation:
Something that is long gone and no longer believed.

Lars Helbig
Germany
Local time: 14:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Rosas: and this works, too!
3 mins

agree  Melzie
27 mins

agree  Tony M
57 mins

agree  Buck
4 hrs

agree  Sophia Finos
9 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: -
14 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Last/past/former/in days gone by


Explanation:
With no further context, it is difficult to know which term fits best so try them all with your sentence.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2007-04-02 15:35:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Past superstition since people are still superstitious about things today.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 14:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Melzie: sorry, that's really wrong, this is about English. One of my favorite examples of the genre (which does mean the same thing) is sampooing which, though related, does not mean the same thing in the two languages
27 mins

disagree  Tony M: No, this is a 'faux ami' here, as the usage in EN is quite different from the normal FR meaning
53 mins
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