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how long you were lost

English translation: No! Nothing to do with noticed/out of sight (see below)

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09:53 Nov 1, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / literature
English term or phrase: how long you were lost
It did not matter how long you were lost, sooner or later you would be found.

Is this the correct explanation :" Since you were noticed by other people, it didi not matter how long you were out of sight." ?
xxxfortunetelle
Local time: 15:05
English translation:No! Nothing to do with noticed/out of sight (see below)
Explanation:
Some context would help, but it seems as if "one" was in some safe environment where, even if they lost their bearings and didn't know where they were (they were "lost"), one always knew that they would eventually be "found". I.e., no need to worry if you got lost, as this would soon be rectified.



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Note added at 14 mins (2007-11-01 10:07:59 GMT)
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Incidentally, unless you've been asked to paraphrase this expression, I see no need to change it. It needs no explanation in English
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:05
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4No! Nothing to do with noticed/out of sight (see below)
Carol Gullidge
4 +2...since you would eventually...
Jack Doughty
4 +1not necessarily physically lostxxxcorbett bogd


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
...since you would eventually...


Explanation:
" Since you would eventually be discovered by other people, it did not matter how long you were out of sight" would be a clearer way of explaining it.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 514
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you .)

Asker: Thank you:)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carol Gullidge: although not sure that "out of sight" necessarily comes into it//I agree - and wonder what the purpose of the question is
2 mins
  -> You're probably right, it's difficult to offer an explanation of something which seems so clear already.//Yes.

agree  Ken Cox: and see my comment on Carol's answer
1 hr
  -> Thank you.
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
No! Nothing to do with noticed/out of sight (see below)


Explanation:
Some context would help, but it seems as if "one" was in some safe environment where, even if they lost their bearings and didn't know where they were (they were "lost"), one always knew that they would eventually be "found". I.e., no need to worry if you got lost, as this would soon be rectified.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2007-11-01 10:07:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Incidentally, unless you've been asked to paraphrase this expression, I see no need to change it. It needs no explanation in English

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
Thank you
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams
6 mins
  -> thanks, cmwilliams!

agree  Ken Cox: indeed -- and given the absence of context, it could well be interpreted figuratively. Also (for the asker), this is a conditional construction describing a situation in the past.\\Yes, it's quasi-conditional, but that's even harder to explain.
1 hr
  -> thanks, Ken! It certainly could be interpreted figuratively, although I don't think it's necessarily conditional

agree  Patricia Townshend
6 hrs
  -> thanks, Patricia!

agree  ARTES
17 hrs
  -> thanks, ARTES!
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1 day12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
not necessarily physically lost


Explanation:
The length of your trouble (anguish, wayward activity) didn't matter, eventually someone or something would save you from your difficulties.

xxxcorbett bogd
Canada
Local time: 06:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  katie_b: Yes, that's how I read it - "No situation is permanent."
5 hrs
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