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pints

English translation: a pint (here: of beer)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pints
English translation:a pint (here: of beer)
Entered by: Jason Ma
Options:
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14:39 Mar 9, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: pints
But we can still pull on pack and boot and head to the hills. Tread the coastal paths of Wales or Cornwall, say, where the day is one long rainbow of mist, crying gulls and sour heather, and evening brings a fishing harbor clustered in a cove (small bay), and a pub with a slate roof gleaming with sea spray , where pints may have been pouring for half a millennium and more.

Thank you for your assistance.
Jason Ma
China
Local time: 19:55
a pint (here: of beer)
Explanation:
a pint is an old imperial measure for liquid which is most often used in the UK in relation to beer. You will find most beer is served either as a 1/2 pint or pint and in a glass sized accordingly.

Of this I am sure :-)


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Note added at 5 mins (2008-03-09 14:44:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Your sentence here means that beer has been available to buy for 1500+ years.

Pouring probably refers to the bar staff 'pouring the pint' from the beer kegs and serving to the customers. The phrase 'to pour a pint' is often used these days.
Selected response from:

xxxPoveyTrans
Local time: 12:55
Grading comment
Thanks for your assistance.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +13a pint (here: of beer)xxxPoveyTrans
4 +2measurement unit of fluids
Adele Oliveri


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
measurement unit of fluids


Explanation:
the author is talking about pints of beer - a pint is roughly equal to half a litre and it's the standard unit of measurement used in british pubs.

Adele Oliveri
Italy
Local time: 13:55
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mark Nathan
16 mins
  -> thank you :-)

agree  V_N
1 day51 mins
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +13
a pint (here: of beer)


Explanation:
a pint is an old imperial measure for liquid which is most often used in the UK in relation to beer. You will find most beer is served either as a 1/2 pint or pint and in a glass sized accordingly.

Of this I am sure :-)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2008-03-09 14:44:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Your sentence here means that beer has been available to buy for 1500+ years.

Pouring probably refers to the bar staff 'pouring the pint' from the beer kegs and serving to the customers. The phrase 'to pour a pint' is often used these days.

xxxPoveyTrans
Local time: 12:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks for your assistance.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mihaela Ghiuzeli
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Adele Oliveri: :-D
0 min
  -> Thanks

agree  Carol Gullidge: yes, a pint in a pub is a metaphor for a drink of beer. If you're going out "for a pint", that means you're going to drink some beer [for Asker's benefit - I'm sure you don't need to be told!]
4 mins
  -> Indeed - this is my first ever 100% answer :-)

agree  Patricia Townshend
5 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Jack Doughty: Even as one who never drinks beer, I have no doubt you're right.
13 mins
  -> Thanks Jack!!

agree  Mark Nathan
16 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Mark Berelekhis
31 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  NancyLynn: And as one who enjoys a pint, cheers :-) // oh, aye, they're jars in Eire, too
1 hr
  -> Thanks Nancy - I have heard them called 'jars' in Yorkshire

agree  Cristina Santos
7 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Will Matter
10 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  orientalhorizon
10 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Phong Le
20 hrs
  -> Thanks Phong

agree  V_N
1 day52 mins
  -> Thanks
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): EdithK


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