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mithered

English translation: bothered

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:mithered
English translation:bothered
Entered by: Angela Arnone
Options:
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11:45 Dec 3, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Fiction
English term or phrase: mithered
Whatever words he spoke were preceded by a long drawn-out whine.
- Another slice of corn-beef pie, Gordon?
- Eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee, well, no, I'm not much mithered, but...
Alexander Alexandrov
Russian Federation
Local time: 01:16
bothered
Explanation:
Seems to be used in several regional dialects and I recall that understood it to mean "bothered".
"Don't mither me" would be "don't bother me".
In this case he's saying he doesn't mind one way or the other, I think. He isn't that hungry but he'll eat another slice if he's offered it.
Hope this helps
Angela (who is an English native speaker despite her exotic surname!)
Selected response from:

Angela Arnone
Local time: 00:16
Grading comment
Thank you, Angela, and all, for help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6bothered
David Knowles
5 +4bothered
Angela Arnone
4 +3bothered - I don't mind much one way or the otherxxxCMJ_Trans
3 +4I'm not fussed, I'm not overly bothered
jerrie
2 +3don't care/have no preference
seaMount


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
bothered - I don't mind much one way or the other


Explanation:
regionalism.

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 00:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
bothered


Explanation:
To mither is to bother, trouble, disturb. "I'm not mithered" also means "I don't mind" "it doesn't bother me".
Dialectal - probably Lancashire, since that's where my mother comes from!

David Knowles
Local time: 23:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr

agree  Tony M: Think its general North Country; my own family from Blackburn didn't use it, but my friends from Yorkshire DO!
1 hr

agree  Jane Gabbutt: It goes further south - I'm from Lincolnshire and have always used it.
2 hrs

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs

agree  Charlotte Allen: Yes - native Yorkshire lass can confirm we used it on our side of the Pennines too.
10 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
bothered


Explanation:
Seems to be used in several regional dialects and I recall that understood it to mean "bothered".
"Don't mither me" would be "don't bother me".
In this case he's saying he doesn't mind one way or the other, I think. He isn't that hungry but he'll eat another slice if he's offered it.
Hope this helps
Angela (who is an English native speaker despite her exotic surname!)


Angela Arnone
Local time: 00:16
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you, Angela, and all, for help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs

agree  trautlady
12 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I'm not fussed, I'm not overly bothered


Explanation:
Chamber gives mither - see moider: confuse, stupify, overcome ...

I'm not overly bothered whether I do or don't, but ... if you twist my arm ... oh go on, then!


    Reference: http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/m.htm
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 96

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs

agree  Refugio: Yes, "I don't mind if I do." Though professed not to be still hungry, he is definitely accepting another slice.
3 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +3
don't care/have no preference


Explanation:
Literally it means: I'm not bothered or annoyed.
Maybe it can (also) be read as:
I don't really care
or
I don't have a strong preference

seaMount
Local time: 00:16
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr

agree  Java Cafe
3 hrs

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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