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bunny

English translation: confined, circumscribed place

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09:27 Dec 4, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: bunny
From W. H. Auden's poem "Horae Canonicae"
....
The eager ridge, the steady sea,
The flat roofs of the fishing village
Still asleep ***in its bunny,***
Though as fresh and sunny still,....
Costas Zannis
Local time: 03:33
English translation:confined, circumscribed place
Explanation:
Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Definition: \Bun"ny\, n. (Mining)
A great collection of ore without any vein coming into it or
going out from it.

For me, it gives the idea of the village being cut off from the rest of the world, self-contained.






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Note added at 4 hrs 58 mins (2004-12-04 14:25:34 GMT)
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Found this interesting info:

...In those early years, Auden\'s principal interests were scientific, especially geology and mining (although he was also precociously reading Freud), but in 1922--the same year in which Auden discovered that he had lost his religious belief--Robert Medley, a friend and classmate, suggested to him that he should write poetry...

http://occawlonline.pearsoned.com/bookbind/pubbooks/kennedy2...

Wonderful poet by the way.
Selected response from:

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 02:33
Grading comment
Thanks for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4confined, circumscribed placeDr Sue Levy


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
confined, circumscribed place


Explanation:
Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Definition: \Bun"ny\, n. (Mining)
A great collection of ore without any vein coming into it or
going out from it.

For me, it gives the idea of the village being cut off from the rest of the world, self-contained.






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 58 mins (2004-12-04 14:25:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Found this interesting info:

...In those early years, Auden\'s principal interests were scientific, especially geology and mining (although he was also precociously reading Freud), but in 1922--the same year in which Auden discovered that he had lost his religious belief--Robert Medley, a friend and classmate, suggested to him that he should write poetry...

http://occawlonline.pearsoned.com/bookbind/pubbooks/kennedy2...

Wonderful poet by the way.

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 02:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Asghar Bhatti
2 hrs

agree  seaMount
2 hrs

agree  Charlie Bavington: or in a "hollow", maybe? It's not in the OED, with any such meaning (even your mining one) curiously....
4 hrs
  -> I haven't found it elsewhere either - may be regional word

agree  Judith Kerman: interesting... maybe he made it up - suggests a warm nest - but as used, it does sound like a folk wording. Of course Auden's perfectly capable of making an invention sound timeless.
1 day5 hrs

neutral  Tony M: Well, I'd never have known that! Just wanted to say that OED DOES give bunny as a swelling on an animal's joint (cf. bunion) --- so perhaps easy to see where a 'lump' of ore might come from...
1 day6 hrs
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