KudoZ home » English » Religion

ARAMAIC: God

English translation: Etymology of the word "God":

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:God
English translation:Etymology of the word "God":
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:06 Jan 12, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - Religion / biblical, research, modern translations, etc.
English term or phrase: ARAMAIC: God
ARAMAIC:

I was just wondering is anyone knows where the word the "God(s)" originates. And what would it be in english when translated hand-over? I'm not sure if it came from a Greek, (Aramaic,) Hebrew, or Latin word, so I am posting it is all sections. If you know the answer to this question, please let me know. I would be most greatful. Thank you.
Annie
Etymology of the word "God":
Explanation:
Etymology of the Word "God"
(Anglo-Saxon God; German Gott; akin to Persian khoda; Hindu khooda).

God can variously be defined as:

-the proper name of the one Supreme and Infinite Personal Being, the Creator and Ruler of the universe, to whom man owes obedience and worship;
-the common or generic name of the several supposed beings to whom, in polytheistic religions, Divine attributes are ascribed and Divine worship rendered;
-the name sometimes applied to an idol as the image or dwelling-place of a god.

The root-meaning of the name (from Gothic root gheu; Sanskrit hub or emu, "to invoke or to sacrifice to") is either "the one invoked" or "the one sacrificed to."
From different Indo-Germanic roots (div, "to shine" or "give light"; thes in thessasthai "to implore") come the Indo-Iranian deva, Sanskrit dyaus (gen. divas), Latin deus, Greek theos, Irish and Gaelic dia, all of which are generic names; also Greek Zeus (gen. Dios, Latin Jupiter (jovpater), Old Teutonic Tiu or Tiw (surviving in Tuesday), Latin Janus, Diana, and other proper names of pagan deities. The common name most widely used in Semitic occurs as 'el in Hebrew, 'ilu in Babylonian, 'ilah in Arabic, etc.; and though scholars are not agreed on the point, the root-meaning most probably is "the strong or mighty one."

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06608x.htm
Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 15:03
Grading comment
^o^ Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5Sorry but this is NOT correct!lacplesis
4 -1Etymology of the word "God":
Evert DELOOF-SYS


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Etymology of the word "God":


Explanation:
Etymology of the Word "God"
(Anglo-Saxon God; German Gott; akin to Persian khoda; Hindu khooda).

God can variously be defined as:

-the proper name of the one Supreme and Infinite Personal Being, the Creator and Ruler of the universe, to whom man owes obedience and worship;
-the common or generic name of the several supposed beings to whom, in polytheistic religions, Divine attributes are ascribed and Divine worship rendered;
-the name sometimes applied to an idol as the image or dwelling-place of a god.

The root-meaning of the name (from Gothic root gheu; Sanskrit hub or emu, "to invoke or to sacrifice to") is either "the one invoked" or "the one sacrificed to."
From different Indo-Germanic roots (div, "to shine" or "give light"; thes in thessasthai "to implore") come the Indo-Iranian deva, Sanskrit dyaus (gen. divas), Latin deus, Greek theos, Irish and Gaelic dia, all of which are generic names; also Greek Zeus (gen. Dios, Latin Jupiter (jovpater), Old Teutonic Tiu or Tiw (surviving in Tuesday), Latin Janus, Diana, and other proper names of pagan deities. The common name most widely used in Semitic occurs as 'el in Hebrew, 'ilu in Babylonian, 'ilah in Arabic, etc.; and though scholars are not agreed on the point, the root-meaning most probably is "the strong or mighty one."

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06608x.htm

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 15:03
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
Grading comment
^o^ Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  lacplesis: See below, please! Thanks!
66 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

66 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Sorry but this is NOT correct!


Explanation:
First of all: "God" is a purely English hence Germanic word, it is not borrowed from Latin or Greek. European languages have nothing to do with Hebrew or Aramaic, these two are Semitic hence belonging to a completely different language-family. Though our religion, Christianity, is borrowed from the East. King James' Bible is a translation of the Latin "Vulgata" which is a translation of the Greek "Septuaginta". Nonetheless, our languages have NOTHING to do with our religion!
Concerning the answer: "gheu" is NOT a Gothic root, it is an Indo-European root meaning "to pour" hence also "to libate". Gothic "guth", German "Gott" etc. have nothing to do with this root. There is another Indo-European root, having an auslauting laryngeal "ghweH" meaning "to cry out" and also "to invoke", but any of its derivations would hardly have given the Germanic word.
I am sorry for writing the characters in a scientifically uncorrect way, but I hope it gets more intelligible that way.
There is NO Sanskrit root "hub" and NO root "emu", these two simply do not exist. There are the roots "hav" on the one hand and "huu" with a long "u" on the other hand. Their meanings are "to pour, to libate" and "to cry out, to invoke". However, as we have seen, none of those two has got anything to do with the Germanic words.
But the most important point is: Greek "theos", Latin "Janus" must in NO way be compared to "deva", "dyaus", "día", "deus", "tiwaz" (that would be the right reconstruction of the Germanic god's name, Old Norse "Tyr", Old High German "Ziu").
Furthermore, the root in "theos" is in NO way comparable to the one in "thessasthai" AND the root therein is NOT "thes". The root in "thessasthai" is the one to be found in "potheo (with o mega of course)" and to be reconstructed as Indo-European "gwhedh". I am sorry, but some of the etymologies presented by you, except of the "dyaus"-family, are simply incorrect.
As far as the Semitic words are concerned, you are right. However, I am not that a semitist to decide whether the presumed root-meaning is correct or not. But I have some experience in Indo-European linguistics, that is why I am quite sure about what I have stated above.
Please do understand that this is not a confrontation, I just wanted to set some things right. Of course, I do not want my answer to be rated since it is not possible anymore. For both of you this should just be something to think about! Science is not opinion and it is not religion either.
Best wishes, HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-03-19 14:57:08 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Persian \"khodaa\" is not akin to \"God\" either, simply on sound-law grounds!

lacplesis
Local time: 15:03
Native speaker of: Native in LatvianLatvian, Native in GermanGerman
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Apr 16, 2006 - Changes made by Fabio Descalzi:
Language pairzzz Other zzz to English » English
FieldOther » Social Sciences
Field (specific)(none) » Religion


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search