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sea ice driven

English translation: sea-ice-driven

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21:32 Mar 12, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Science (general) / hyphen usage
English term or phrase: sea ice driven
How (if at all) would you place the hyphen(s) in "sea ice driven process" when the intention is to indicate that the process is driven by the formation/melt of sea ice. Thanks in advance.
Anna Haxen
Denmark
Local time: 20:45
English translation:sea-ice-driven
Explanation:
Or sea-ice driven.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:45
Grading comment
Thank you. Sadly, the editor at the journal this paper was submitted to insists on sea ice-driven and won't budge. Nice to have my own solution confirmed by pros, though.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5sea-ice-driven
Jack Doughty
3 +3commentKen Cox
3 +1no hyphen
Nesrin
5 -1no hyphens are necessary
airmailrpl


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
sea-ice-driven


Explanation:
Or sea-ice driven.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
Grading comment
Thank you. Sadly, the editor at the journal this paper was submitted to insists on sea ice-driven and won't budge. Nice to have my own solution confirmed by pros, though.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: IMHO full hyphenation is formally better but visually awkward; English doesn't handle multipart qualifiers especially gracefully. If you can't rely on prior knowledge on the part of the reader, you should introduce the term first with a paraphrase.
7 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  jccantrell: Agree with Ken. Hyphenate the whole thing cause it is modifying 'process' or, if you can, rewrite the damn phrase.
44 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  JaneTranslates: I prefer your second option: sea-ice driven. It's a compound within a compound. "Folsom Lake-East Side diversion project" is example given in American Guide to Pronunciation. Rewriting is, of course, best.
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Seema Ugrankar: Second option
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  kmtext: I'd go for the two hyphens.
10 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  David Moore: Here, full hyphenation for me
13 hrs
  -> Thank you.

disagree  airmailrpl: the simplest solution is to eliminate hyphens entirely
14 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
no hyphen


Explanation:
I think it's best not to place any hyphen at all. If "sea ice" was one word, it would have made sense to put a hyphen between that word and the word "driven", as in "market-driven", though I wouldn't say it's obligatory. But "sea ice-driven" looks confusing, in my opinion.

Nesrin
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Arabic
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: it's best not to place any hyphen at all
2 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
no hyphens are necessary


Explanation:
Australian Antarctic Division - Sea IceThe Antarctic sea ice zone is highly dynamic. Ice is constantly driven by winds and ocean ... Sea ice can thicken to 10 meters or more by this process. ...
www.aad.gov.au/default.asp?casid=5546


airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 15:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ken Cox: Omitting hyphens has indeed become commonplace in US English, often to the dismay of people (such as me) with a more traditional bent. It makes composition easier but opens the door to misunderstanding.
11 mins
  -> still are not necessary

disagree  David Moore: Agree with Ken, but a little more strongly...
13 hrs
  -> still are not necessary
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
comment


Explanation:
Although technical texts in particular abound with constructions with multipart qualifiers, and nowadays they are often written without hyphens, they have the fundamental disadvantage in English that they are ambigous without hyphens and clumsy with hyphens. IMO you could argue that this is not a natural form of composition in English; it amounts to imposing a German (or similar) model of word formation on English.

In some cases, particularly with compound qualifiers having four or more elements (not at all unusual in technical texts), it is difficult to arrive at meaningful hyphenation, and the simplest solution is to eliminate hyphens entirely.
In this case you should bear in mind that there is a good chance that people who are not familiar with the term or the subject may not understand the intended meaning or may misunderstand the meaning.

If clarity and ease of understanding are of paramount importance, you should avoid such constructions or at least use them with restraint and only with proper introduction.

Ken Cox
Local time: 20:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Moore
12 hrs

agree  airmailrpl: the simplest solution is to eliminate hyphens entirely
13 hrs

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc
15 hrs
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