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Sea chest

English translation: storage for provisions / precious items / personal possessions

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Sea chest
English translation:storage for provisions / precious items / personal possessions
Entered by: Empty Whiskey Glass
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08:08 Apr 5, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime
English term or phrase: Sea chest
This is a part of a ship. Does anybody have any idea what part this is?
Empty Whiskey Glass
Local time: 21:58
storage for provisions / precious items / personal possessions
Explanation:
storage box / chest / trunk

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-05 08:13:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Introduction: Going to sea was an enterprise that could take months or years. Each sailor was allowed only a small amount of storage space in the cramped foc’s’le. If he was careful, he could pack everything he was likely to need in his sea-chest. The sea-chest was often carved or decorated with intricately worked handles, showcasing the skill of its owner. Sea chests held about as much as a modern duffel bag, but the supplies were expected to last throughout the voyage. The ship\'s store (slop chest) sold canvas, twine, and other supplies to sailors, but the sailor had to know how to construct shirts, trousers, hat, and jacket, as well as how to mend them.

The following verses were found in a log or journal from the whaling ship Ocean Rover and were written in 1859. They would probably have been sung to a popular tune of the time; it works well with the tune to \"The Sailor’s Alphabet\" (see resources). In the song we are told about what a prudent and experienced sailor would take along on a sea voyage. This song is taken from Gale Huntington’s wonderful resource, Songs the Whalemen Sang (Dover, 1970).

The following verses were found in a log or journal from the whaling ship Ocean Rover and were written in 1859. They would probably have been sung to a popular tune of the time; it works well with the tune to \"The Sailor’s Alphabet\" (see resources). In the song we are told about what a prudent and experienced sailor would take along on a sea voyage. This song is taken from Gale Huntington’s wonderful resource, Songs the Whalemen Sang (Dover, 1970).

A FITTING OUT

A chest that is neither too large nor too small
Is the first thing to which your attention I\'ll call
The things to put in it are next to be named
And if I omit some I\'m not to be blamed

Stow first in the bottom a blanket or quilt
To be used on the voyage whenever you wilt
Thick trousers and shirts woolen stockings and shoes
Next your papers and books to tell you the news

Good substantial tarpaulins to cover your head
Just to say keep it furled N. C. nuff said
Carry paper and ink pens wafers and wax
A shoemaker\'s last awls and some small tacks

Some cotton and thread silk needles and palm
And a paper of pins as long as your arm
Two vests and a thimble a large lot of matches
A lot of old clothes that will answer for patches

A Bible and hymn book of course you must carry
If at the end of the voyage you expect for to marry
Don\'t forget to take esseners pipes and cigars
Of the sweetest of butter a couple of jars

A razor you will want a pencil and slate
A comb and a hairbrush you will need for your pate
A brush and some shaving soap and plenty of squills
And a box of those excellent Richardson\'s pills

A podeldoe and pain killer surely you will need
And something to stop the red stream should you bleed
Some things I\'ve omitted but never mind that
Eat salt junk and hard bread and laugh and grow fat.

Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:58
Grading comment
Excellent! Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9storage for provisions / precious items / personal possessions
jerrie
5see link
Hacene


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
storage for provisions / precious items / personal possessions


Explanation:
storage box / chest / trunk

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-05 08:13:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Introduction: Going to sea was an enterprise that could take months or years. Each sailor was allowed only a small amount of storage space in the cramped foc’s’le. If he was careful, he could pack everything he was likely to need in his sea-chest. The sea-chest was often carved or decorated with intricately worked handles, showcasing the skill of its owner. Sea chests held about as much as a modern duffel bag, but the supplies were expected to last throughout the voyage. The ship\'s store (slop chest) sold canvas, twine, and other supplies to sailors, but the sailor had to know how to construct shirts, trousers, hat, and jacket, as well as how to mend them.

The following verses were found in a log or journal from the whaling ship Ocean Rover and were written in 1859. They would probably have been sung to a popular tune of the time; it works well with the tune to \"The Sailor’s Alphabet\" (see resources). In the song we are told about what a prudent and experienced sailor would take along on a sea voyage. This song is taken from Gale Huntington’s wonderful resource, Songs the Whalemen Sang (Dover, 1970).

The following verses were found in a log or journal from the whaling ship Ocean Rover and were written in 1859. They would probably have been sung to a popular tune of the time; it works well with the tune to \"The Sailor’s Alphabet\" (see resources). In the song we are told about what a prudent and experienced sailor would take along on a sea voyage. This song is taken from Gale Huntington’s wonderful resource, Songs the Whalemen Sang (Dover, 1970).

A FITTING OUT

A chest that is neither too large nor too small
Is the first thing to which your attention I\'ll call
The things to put in it are next to be named
And if I omit some I\'m not to be blamed

Stow first in the bottom a blanket or quilt
To be used on the voyage whenever you wilt
Thick trousers and shirts woolen stockings and shoes
Next your papers and books to tell you the news

Good substantial tarpaulins to cover your head
Just to say keep it furled N. C. nuff said
Carry paper and ink pens wafers and wax
A shoemaker\'s last awls and some small tacks

Some cotton and thread silk needles and palm
And a paper of pins as long as your arm
Two vests and a thimble a large lot of matches
A lot of old clothes that will answer for patches

A Bible and hymn book of course you must carry
If at the end of the voyage you expect for to marry
Don\'t forget to take esseners pipes and cigars
Of the sweetest of butter a couple of jars

A razor you will want a pencil and slate
A comb and a hairbrush you will need for your pate
A brush and some shaving soap and plenty of squills
And a box of those excellent Richardson\'s pills

A podeldoe and pain killer surely you will need
And something to stop the red stream should you bleed
Some things I\'ve omitted but never mind that
Eat salt junk and hard bread and laugh and grow fat.




    Reference: http://www.sea.edu/k12lessonplans/k12Seachest.htm
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Excellent! Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hacene: too bad that while I was going collecting the link I didn't see your answer
3 mins
  -> No problems ;-))

agree  Tony M: Great!
4 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  elenus
30 mins

agree  SMLS
32 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Lawyer-Linguist: Excellent research!
59 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  Gayle Wallimann
4 hrs

agree  DGK T-I
4 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  hookmv: good answer!
8 hrs
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
sea chest
see link


Explanation:
simply


    Reference: http://www.dalex.com/SeaChest/aboutyour.html
Hacene
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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