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dude (need UK equivalent)

English translation: Mate, she's well fit!

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12:47 Feb 11, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Slang
English term or phrase: dude (need UK equivalent)
Context is one teenage boy speaking to another about a girl. He says something like, "Dude, she's really hot". What would a teenage boy say in a similar situation in the UK? Does "dude" work, or... what? For that matter, what about the "she's really hot" part?

TIA!
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 20:29
English translation:Mate, she's well fit!
Explanation:
Hope it helps ;

Sara

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Note added at 12 mins (2007-02-11 13:00:11 GMT)
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Interestingly, for me at least, one of my colleagues at my "day job" was talking about the wealth of expressions her son was baffling her with at the moment. One of them was "He's me blood" meaning friend/mate. When asked why he used "blood", he replied, "Well, he's me brother from another mother, innit?".

;)

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Note added at 15 mins (2007-02-11 13:02:56 GMT)
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If it helps, my day job is working for a Child & Adolescent Mental Health Team In the UK. I know from my contacts that "mate" is used. Well, in my "hood", at any rate.
Selected response from:

Sara Noss
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:29
Grading comment
Thanks, Sara, this is what I used. Thanks also to the other answerers and to all the peer graders.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +20Mate, she's well fit!Sara Noss
5 -1mate, dude, man
Andreea Bostan
4pal or may be bloke
Fayez Roumieh
3geezerAlexander Demyanov
3comment NFPKen Cox


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
dude (need uk equivalent)
mate, dude, man


Explanation:
http://www.google.co.uk/search?num=50&hl=en&sa=X&oi=spell&re...

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Note added at 6 mins (2007-02-11 12:54:14 GMT)
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dude is very much used in the UK! My nephew uses it all the time!

Andreea Bostan
United Kingdom
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  BrigitteHilgner: "Mate", yes (but that was already suggested by Babayaga), but "dude" seems a bit old-fashioned.
3 mins

disagree  Konstantin Kisin: mate is used by all, not just adults, as is "she's well fit" - I know, I grew up here. Dude is an americanism while I think Cindy is looking for something distinctly British.
9 mins

disagree  Fan Gao: With KK, "dude" will always be considered an Americanism however much it's used in the UK.
4 hrs

agree  PB Trans: Dude is an Americanism but now widely used in the UK. I'd use "mate" in this context though.
1 day2 hrs
  -> Thanks:)
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +20
dude (need uk equivalent)
Mate, she's well fit!


Explanation:
Hope it helps ;

Sara

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2007-02-11 13:00:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Interestingly, for me at least, one of my colleagues at my "day job" was talking about the wealth of expressions her son was baffling her with at the moment. One of them was "He's me blood" meaning friend/mate. When asked why he used "blood", he replied, "Well, he's me brother from another mother, innit?".

;)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2007-02-11 13:02:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If it helps, my day job is working for a Child & Adolescent Mental Health Team In the UK. I know from my contacts that "mate" is used. Well, in my "hood", at any rate.

Sara Noss
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:29
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks, Sara, this is what I used. Thanks also to the other answerers and to all the peer graders.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
4 mins
  -> Thank you.

disagree  Andreea Bostan: not used so much between kids; used more between aduts
5 mins
  -> Sorry, I beg to differ on this one, mate. ;)

agree  BrigitteHilgner: Isn't is fascinating how language keeps changing?!
5 mins
  -> Very. I love the creativeness behind some of the changes, too.

neutral  Alexander Demyanov: The problem with "mate" is that it's rather old and "multigenerraltional" while AE "dude" is more of youth slang.//I see that "mate" is coming back, but translating "dude" as "mate" whould drop the nuances/connotations "dude" carries.
8 mins
  -> It seems to be enjoying a revival here, but certainly, there is more than one way to hail a friend. From what I hear, "mate" has the edge at the moment. :)

agree  Konstantin Kisin: absolutely. I am laughing at the neutrals/disagrees to your answer. Someone basing their comment on a dictionary when we're talking about slang - hilarious.
8 mins
  -> Nothing like a little entertainment to liven up a quiet Sunday, eh? Thank you, Konstantin.

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
20 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Tony M: It's great the way "mate" has come back in, and I certainly hear it a lot between young people; I must say the "she's well fit" expression is not familiar to me; I'd have said "a bit of alright", but I suspect that is now rather (very?) dated
24 mins
  -> "a bit of alright" is ok, but I think it is used by ever so slighty older "geezers" - the ones just out of their teens. ;) Thanks, Tony.

agree  Ioanna Karamanou: with Konstantin... like "dude" hasn't been around forever anyways...
2 hrs
  -> Good point! Thank you.

agree  Laura Terrett
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Roman Bardachev
4 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Fan Gao: Definitely the most widespread and spoken by the broadest age range. Can't go wrong with "mate" whichever part of the UK you come from:)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, CC. It isn't that the other options would not be understood in their way, but mate is catch-all. It can be used amongst friends or to address unknown peers/individuals.

agree  Peter Shortall
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Peter.

agree  jerrie
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, jerrie.

agree  Melissa Stanfield: I remember first coming across this in London - I love it! ;)//A lot of the argument is circling around terms not fitting perfectly - they never do, especially with slang! This (dude/mate) is closest by far
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Melissa.

agree  Teresa Goscinska
15 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Hakki Ucar: a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance; http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dude; Sorry, on second though , your answer seems much closer,
18 hrs
  -> Ok, but is that how it is used in Cindy's AE example? Even there I think it is a casual way to address another boy, much like "mate" would be in the UK. :)

agree  Veronica Coquard: Here's an interesting website for slang: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=d&p=19
19 hrs
  -> Cheers, Inkling!

agree  missdutch
19 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Robert Fox
21 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  PB Trans: I live in London and "mate" is not only used by adults. What about the song Dry your eyes (mate) by the Streets? http://www.lyricstop.com/d/dryyoureyes-thestreets.html See also this link: http://www.londonslang.com/db/f/ http://tinyurl.com/2axnar
1 day24 mins
  -> Didn't he also write a song that included the lyrics "You're fit, but my god, don't you know it!"? It may even have been the title. Thanks, Pina. :)

agree  Sophia Finos
1 day28 mins
  -> Thank you, Sophia.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
5 days
  -> Thank you.

agree  John Alphonse: Does ths mean that "chap"is totally out of usage?
12 days
  -> Not totally, but I think that, for now, as far as teen-speak goes it is. Thank you.
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56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
dude (need uk equivalent)
pal or may be bloke


Explanation:
Dude in North America

Fayez Roumieh
United States
Local time: 14:29
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dude (need uk equivalent)
comment NFP


Explanation:
- as this won't fit in a peer comment field (even an empty one) -

Terms such as geezer, nigga, bitch, bastard, etc. that originally had or still have negative or perjorative connotations are often used in slang in the opposite sense, but in most cases the users are well aware of the negative connotation and use the terms expressly to emphasise the opposite meaning or transform it into a positive attribute within a particular social and cultural context.

In this sense, a young person might well refer to a respected acquaintance or friend as a 'geezer', just as an adult might call a respected acquaintance an 'old bastard', but that's not the same as addressing the person by the term.

It's also possible to address a person by such a term, or use it as a sort of form of address, such as 'nigga/bitch, get a load of that!', and of course that *could* be done with 'geezer' as well. The question remains as to whether it is actually used that way, or at least how common such usage is.

Other relevant considerations here are (a) whether it advisable to use a term that is relatively risky (such as geezer) when a perfectly good non-risky term (mate) is available, and (b) the relative equivalence of the terms. AFAIK 'dude' originally had a negative connotation, but IMO this has long been forgotten in common US usage, where 'dude' has a positive connotation. (Naturally, it can also be used sarcastically, but that is presumably not the case here).

Ken Cox
Local time: 20:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dude (need uk equivalent)
geezer


Explanation:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=geezer

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Note added at 17 mins (2007-02-11 13:05:01 GMT)
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In particular, definition 7 of the article:

7. Geezer

british slang, a term used by young people to say hello to thier respected friends.

howsit going geeza? fancy a pint?
yeh man...
nice one

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Note added at 42 mins (2007-02-11 13:30:09 GMT)
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Yo Yo Yo Co-el-ho
what's going down geeza?
http://www.myspace.com/poetryjoe

I waked into an electronics store and a salesman yells out, "What's up, geeza?"
http://forums.macrumors.com/archive/index.php/t-129292.html



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Note added at 48 mins (2007-02-11 13:36:04 GMT)
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Hi geeza, just added some pix of the xmas party gig...love & kisses,
http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewpro...

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-02-11 15:07:53 GMT)
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To Konstantin's deleted comment "...so the fact that everyone uses "mate" is irrelevant. LOL, OK":

That fact is very relevant and is at the core of my point: in AE not "everybody" uses "dude" and people take on slangs in part to be or seem different from "everybody"



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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-02-11 15:29:23 GMT)
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Geezer/geeza may be a bit obscure and narrow restricted to certain narrow/young/rap-loving population (usage of "dude" in the US is significantly wider). So "geezer"/"geeza" is probably not the right choice.


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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-02-11 15:37:02 GMT)
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I'd still like to note another problem with "mate" as a translation for "dude": in addition to be too common/universal, it is used (in the meaning of interest to this question) to address someone, while "dude" is used (in the same meaning) to refer to a third person.

Besides, even as a term of address, "dude" isn't necessarilly as "friendly" as "mate". It's more neutral.

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 14:29
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Konstantin Kisin: geezer is never used to address someone in the way that you would use "dude", "mate", "man" etc. // Tell me, do these people you meet in Boston call themselves Brittons too? It's just that British people are "Brits" not Brittons...
11 mins
  -> "Dude" is not used by everybody as "mate" is in BE. I meet enough Britons of all ages in Boston and hear how they speak.//No, they are careful to be more specific.//Well, if you havent' heard the usage, you may want to look it up.//Typos aside

disagree  Ken Cox: fully agree with Konstantin -- addressing someone directly as 'geezer' would normally be insulting. Did you check the peer rating of item 7 in the urban dictionary entry?
18 mins
  -> Good point. Thank you.//However, you may have been detached from "street talk". "Myspace" is a good indicator.

agree  Fan Gao: I'll agree with you just from my own personal experience. I worked in London for 10 years and calling each other "geez", "alright geez, howz it going" was really common. May have just been a London thing tho, "mate" is certainly used more widespread.
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Concept.

agree  PB Trans: Yes, used all the time in London between friends and not only between the young, rap-loving population... 'ello geezah! :-)
1 day14 mins
  -> Thanks, Pina.
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