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English translation: Probably US Indians because of names like "Sitting Bull"

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17:08 Nov 30, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc.
English term or phrase: Indian
Translating a fiction, I have some problem, not with the terms but the cultural issue.

A girl talked about a man with gray hair, using the term 'Gray Hair'.
She said: "Gray Hair had intercepted the schedule."
A man said "You sound like you're talking about goddamn Indian"
A girl: "Let me know immediately if you see Gray Hair there"
A man: "Not with the Indian names again."


I don't get the relation between the 'Gray Hair' and the 'Indian name' things. Could anyone help me with that? Is it the Indian from India or the native Indian of the US?

Thanks in advance.
minnie
English translation:Probably US Indians because of names like "Sitting Bull"
Explanation:
the girl refers to a grey-haired man as "Grey Hair" - obviously she doesn't know his name - and the man replies that it sounds like an Indian big chief (US)

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Note added at 2004-11-30 17:20:27 (GMT)
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The answer to your question is \"yes\"
Selected response from:

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 07:40
Grading comment
thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10Probably US Indians because of names like "Sitting Bull"xxxCMJ_Trans
3 +6American Indian
Kirill Semenov
4 +2sounds like an American Native's name (US Indian)
Mikhail Kropotov
5pc term is Native American
airmailrpl


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
Probably US Indians because of names like "Sitting Bull"


Explanation:
the girl refers to a grey-haired man as "Grey Hair" - obviously she doesn't know his name - and the man replies that it sounds like an Indian big chief (US)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-11-30 17:20:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The answer to your question is \"yes\"

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 07:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mónica Belén Colacilli
3 mins

agree  Klaus Herrmann: "Stands with a Fist" comes to mind ;)
9 mins

agree  ntext
18 mins

agree  xxxsarahl
32 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 hr

agree  Refugio: Descriptive names are often given
2 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs

agree  Bo Smith: Haven't you watched "Dances With Wolves"? Ah, the husband of "Stands with a Fist".
7 hrs

agree  Pawel Gromek
13 hrs

agree  Lisa Lloyd
17 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
indian
sounds like an American Native's name (US Indian)


Explanation:
I don't think the other connection is likely at all.

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 08:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mónica Belén Colacilli
3 mins
  -> thank you!

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
indian
American Indian


Explanation:
The fragment puns on the idea of giving descriptive names for American Indians, like "Sharp Arrow", "Eagle's Eye", etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-11-30 17:17:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, typical American Indians\' names in the past sounded in a descriptive way, like \"an adjective + a noun\": \"Brave Heart\", \"Eagle\'s Eye\" and so on.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 08:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  George Rabel: totally agree..Crazy Horse, etc. No need to be overly sensitive. It is a perfectly identifiable and innocuous characteristic of their culture
6 mins
  -> I hesitated to put examples like "Crazy Horse" -- PC, you know. :) But I think anyone may find a lot of typical names in James Fenimore Cooper's novels about Native Americans + Right, paleface! ;-) Thanks :)

agree  Java Cafe
8 mins

agree  bigedsenior: american Indian (native American)
27 mins

agree  RHELLER: names were given due to resemblance or connection with characteristic symbol (eagle/bear)
50 mins
  -> thank you, dear Rita, you've put it much better than me :)

agree  Will Matter
2 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
6 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
indian
pc term is Native American


Explanation:
Results 1 - 30 of about 7,570,000 English pages for "Native American"

Native American
n.

A member of any of the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The ancestors of the Native Americans are generally considered by scientists to have entered the Americas from Asia by way of the Bering Strait sometime during the late glacial epoch.

Native American adj.

Usage Note: Many Americans have come to prefer Native American over Indian both as a term of respect and as a corrective to the famous misnomer bestowed on the peoples of the Americas by a geographically befuddled Columbus. There are solid arguments for this preference. Native American eliminates any confusion between indigenous American peoples and the inhabitants of India, making it the clear choice in many official contexts. It is also historically accurate, despite the insistence by some that Indians are no more native to America than anyone else since their ancestors are assumed to have migrated here from Asia. But one sense of native is “being a member of the original inhabitants of a particular place,” and Native Americans' claim to being the original inhabitants of the Americas is unchallenged. ·Accuracy and precision aside, however, the choice between these two terms is often made as a matter of principle. For many, Native American is the only choice for expressing respect toward America's indigenous peoples; Indian is seen as wrong and offensive. For others, the former smacks of bureaucracy and the manipulation of language for political purposes while the latter is the natural English term, its inaptness made irrelevant by long use. Fortunately, this controversy appears to have subsided somewhat in recent years, and it is now common to find the two terms used interchangeably in the same piece of writing. Furthermore, the issue has never been particularly divisive between Indians and non-Indians. While generally welcoming the respectful tone of Native American, most Indian writers have continued to use the older name at least as often as the newer one. ·Native American and Indian are not exact equivalents when referring to the aboriginal peoples of Canada and Alaska. Native American, the broader term, is properly used of all such peoples, whereas Indian is customarily used of the northern Athabaskan and Algonquian peoples in contrast to the Eskimos, Inuits, and Aleuts. Alaska Native (or less commonly Native Alaskan) is also properly used of all indigenous peoples residing in Alaska.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=native american&r=6...

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 02:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  George Rabel: Your contribution is very interesting and informative, but in the context and tone of this translation, the "pc term" would never work at all.
41 mins
  -> in the tone of the original text it would be 'redskin'

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: all very fair but asker said that it was the meaning that was needed and exlcuded the cultural issues explicitly
15 hrs
  -> ??? "not with the terms but the cultural issue."
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