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beeper phone

English translation: A taped interview transmitted via telephone with the required 'beeps'

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:beeper phone
English translation:A taped interview transmitted via telephone with the required 'beeps'
Entered by: airmailrpl
Options:
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17:00 Dec 31, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: beeper phone
That night I did my broadcast via beeper phone right from their hotel suite.

The gut who says that worked as a radio broadcaster and it was in the 1960's
I do not think it is a pager or anything like that.

What is it then?
Lacrimosa
Local time: 20:03
A taped interview transmitted via telephone with the required 'beeps'
Explanation:
Two technical inventions of the war revolutionised radio news on the home front. The wire recorder and the walkie-talkie two-way radio liberated radio news from the newsroom. By the late '40s, reporters could drive to a breaking story, go on the air via mobile transmitter, and record interviews at the scene.

Magnetic tape replaced wire on the recording reels. Battery power replaced the first Wired spring-wound recorders which often ran down in the midst of the interview. "Beeper" phone interviews with ordinary citizens at the scene of a crime, accident or fire, also added authenticity and immediacy to the newscast.


# "Beeper" phone interviews were so named because of the electronic "beep" required by the telephone company and the Canadian
Two technical inventions of the war revolutionised radio news on the home front. The wire recorder and the walkie-talkie two-way radio liberated radio news from the newsroom. By the late '40s, reporters could drive to a breaking story, go on the air via mobile transmitter, and record interviews at the scene.

Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on conversations held over telephones connected to a tape recorder. The party called would then know that he or she was being recorded. Broadcast regulators and the phone company eventually conceded that anybody called by a reporter would be expected to assume they were talking "for the record" and the intrusive "beep" was discontinued
www.broadcasting-history.ca/news/radnews.html


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Note added at 2003-01-01 23:40:43 (GMT)
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sorry about the repeated first part of the reference text...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 23:41:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

# \"Beeper\" phone interviews were so named because of the electronic \"beep\" required by the telephone company and the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on conversations held over telephones connected to a tape recorder. The party called would then know that he or she was being recorded. Broadcast regulators and the phone company eventually conceded that anybody called by a reporter would be expected to assume they were talking \"for the record\" and the intrusive \"beep\" was discontinued
www.broadcasting-history.ca/news/radnews.html
Selected response from:

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 15:03
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2A taped interview transmitted via telephone with the required 'beeps'
airmailrpl
4buscaHerman Vilella
4Probably a mobile phoneRefugio
3phone versus pager
jerrie
2early mobile telephone device
101translations


  

Answers


35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
early mobile telephone device


Explanation:
After reviewing a couple of instances on Google, I *think* this refers to an early type of portable telephone or radio-based phone, which had a very bad sound quality. My guess is only based on context though.


    Reference: http://www.broadcasting-history.ca/news/radnews.html
    Reference: http://user.pa.net/~ejjeff/abcvarty.html
101translations
Ireland
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  airmailrpl: see below
1 day6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Probably a mobile phone


Explanation:
They were in use in Europe since the 1950's.

Refugio
Local time: 11:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 485

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  airmailrpl: see below
1 day5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
busca


Explanation:
The Auzou multimedia dictionary (Chief Editor Fernando García-Pelayo, whose name rings a bell from the excellent and ecclectic family of Larousse English-Spanish dictionaries) has "beeper" as "busca" or "buscapersonas".

However, a 1980's beeper or "busca" just relayed an oral message from an operator who had received an oral message from the seeker (there was no through connection in the system, although it may have been technically possible). Could it be that through beeper-via-operator a broadcast was conducted? That would indeed have been a (feasible) feat.

Herman Vilella
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  airmailrpl: see below
1 day2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
phone versus pager


Explanation:
If you read the brief History of Cellular Phone, History of pager on link below, I think the 'beeper phone' is really more of a pager.

hth


    Reference: http://www.att.virtualclassroom.org/vc98/vc_80/Main/Technolo...
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  airmailrpl: see below
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
A taped interview transmitted via telephone with the required 'beeps'


Explanation:
Two technical inventions of the war revolutionised radio news on the home front. The wire recorder and the walkie-talkie two-way radio liberated radio news from the newsroom. By the late '40s, reporters could drive to a breaking story, go on the air via mobile transmitter, and record interviews at the scene.

Magnetic tape replaced wire on the recording reels. Battery power replaced the first Wired spring-wound recorders which often ran down in the midst of the interview. "Beeper" phone interviews with ordinary citizens at the scene of a crime, accident or fire, also added authenticity and immediacy to the newscast.


# "Beeper" phone interviews were so named because of the electronic "beep" required by the telephone company and the Canadian
Two technical inventions of the war revolutionised radio news on the home front. The wire recorder and the walkie-talkie two-way radio liberated radio news from the newsroom. By the late '40s, reporters could drive to a breaking story, go on the air via mobile transmitter, and record interviews at the scene.

Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on conversations held over telephones connected to a tape recorder. The party called would then know that he or she was being recorded. Broadcast regulators and the phone company eventually conceded that anybody called by a reporter would be expected to assume they were talking "for the record" and the intrusive "beep" was discontinued
www.broadcasting-history.ca/news/radnews.html


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 23:40:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry about the repeated first part of the reference text...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 23:41:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

# \"Beeper\" phone interviews were so named because of the electronic \"beep\" required by the telephone company and the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on conversations held over telephones connected to a tape recorder. The party called would then know that he or she was being recorded. Broadcast regulators and the phone company eventually conceded that anybody called by a reporter would be expected to assume they were talking \"for the record\" and the intrusive \"beep\" was discontinued
www.broadcasting-history.ca/news/radnews.html

airmailrpl
Brazil
Local time: 15:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 1140

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  101translations: wow! impressive!
7 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Sarah Ponting: sounds convincing to me!
9 hrs
  -> thank you
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