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need a word for a specific type of inhalation therapy

English translation: (water) nebulisation therapy

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17:14 Sep 19, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Tourism & Travel / Spas and spa therapy
English term or phrase: need a word for a specific type of inhalation therapy
Hi everyone,

I need a word in English to describe a type of therapy or treatment given at spas, defined as "inhalation of thick drop(let)s". The term given in the Spanish original is "nebulización", which usually means the same thing as the English "nebulization", with fine rather than thick particles.

In light of this conflict, the PM told me to leave the definition as is and find an appropriate term in English. I've been searching for a while and haven't found any references to this type of therapy in English texts on spas, so haven't been able to find a term. Any ideas?

Thanks!
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 18:22
English translation:(water) nebulisation therapy
Explanation:
I really don't think you're going to find the right word. All the appropriate words in English (atomization, vaporization, nebulization) are already 'taken'.

So you're going to have to let your context do the talking - from the context the reader will realise that you're not talking about the classical nebulisation / vaporisation.

If necessary, you can explain it with "coarse droplet nebulization" or something constructed like that.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2007-09-25 11:15:09 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

If 'nebulisation' means 'fine' by definition, what do 'atomisation' and 'vaporisation' mean??!! - They are definitely very 'fine'.

Let us know what the client says.
Selected response from:

Craig Meulen
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:22
Grading comment
I have pencilled in "coarse (droplet) treatment/therapy" and am waiting to hear back from the client. (I can't use nebulization because by definition that means it's fine rather than coarse). Thanks for the "coarse"--that's a word I needed here. Thanks, too, to everyone else who participated.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3(water) nebulisation therapy
Craig Meulen
3vaporization
jccantrell


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
vaporization


Explanation:
Not a doctor, never visited a spa, but this might fit what you are looking for.


    Reference: http://www.nsti.org/procs/MSM99/16/W31.03
jccantrell
United States
Local time: 09:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
(water) nebulisation therapy


Explanation:
I really don't think you're going to find the right word. All the appropriate words in English (atomization, vaporization, nebulization) are already 'taken'.

So you're going to have to let your context do the talking - from the context the reader will realise that you're not talking about the classical nebulisation / vaporisation.

If necessary, you can explain it with "coarse droplet nebulization" or something constructed like that.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2007-09-25 11:15:09 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

If 'nebulisation' means 'fine' by definition, what do 'atomisation' and 'vaporisation' mean??!! - They are definitely very 'fine'.

Let us know what the client says.

Craig Meulen
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I have pencilled in "coarse (droplet) treatment/therapy" and am waiting to hear back from the client. (I can't use nebulization because by definition that means it's fine rather than coarse). Thanks for the "coarse"--that's a word I needed here. Thanks, too, to everyone else who participated.
Notes to answerer
Asker: The PM pointed out to the client the fact that the accepted meaning of "nebulize" is to convert a liquid into a fine spray, and after some back and forth, "mist" (or "misting")was agreed on (this was the term I had used in the main translation itself--the glossary came a week later as a separate document).


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lietta Warren-Granato: coarse droplet nebulization doesn't sound too bad: after all a lot of therapies have odd names and need an explanation, don't they?
47 mins

agree  kmtext
13 hrs

agree  Elena Aleksandrova
17 hrs
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