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Interior design and interior architecture

Arabic translation: تصميم داخلي، معمار داخلي، تصميم معماري داخلي

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Interior design and interior architecture
Arabic translation:تصميم داخلي، معمار داخلي، تصميم معماري داخلي
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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09:37 Sep 14, 2002
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Architecture
English term or phrase: Interior design and interior architecture
This is the title of a degree program. In the arabian gulf, an interior designers can be referred to as 'muhandis decor' which i don't think is entirely accurate. I would substitute 'mus'samim' for 'muhandis' and would not use the term 'decor' for interior. How would you translate interior in this context? what distinction would you make between design and architecture or would you translate both as 'tasmim'.
xxxmalmuftah
Local time: 16:34
تصميم داخلي، معم
Explanation:
In common Arabic usage, the term MUHANDIS is used for any profession in which geometry plays a great role. Architecture and interior design are such professions, where spatial dimensions, proportions, and relations are paramount. The artist or professional who engages in these activities is seen pouring over diagrams, using H2 pencils, proctors, T-rulers, triangles, compasses, and, these days, CAD software. These are the hallmark of HANDASA in the grand Arab tradition.

The term HANDASA also became the property of engineers, beginning with civil engineers, who share the geometric orientation with architects and designers. Now, all areas of engineering use the term, further contributing to the dulling of the term. I think that part of the problem is the use of the term MUHANDIS as an honorary title (BASH-MUHANDIS, in Egypt). The situation is not very different from the problem with term “doctor” in all languages. Originally, “doctor” simply meant “teacher,” and was mostly used for those who taught “doctrine,” that is, teachings of the Church. Now, of course, “doctor” is a dull-edged term, meaning “physician,” or “a holder of the highest academic degree in a certain area.” My sister is a doctor in nuclear physics, for instance. The appeal of the term comes from the prestige that the term carries.

I agree that MUHANDIS DةCOR may be less than fully satisfactory, but all imported, grafted terms reveal their unhappiness when you start peeling their skin. MUSAMMIM is probably a better choice for “designer,” if our reference point is contemporary Arabic. But if you start peeling its skin, you will see that the original meanings of the root S-M-M include “stopping a hole,” “deafness,” “determination,” “courage,” and so on. “Design” is a relatively recent extension of the sense of “determination.” In a sense, it means, “predetermination,” or “planning ahead.”

So as you can see, words change, sometimes not very rationally, and it is not always possible or even desirable to turn the clock back. In some cases, suggesting new terms, which is what you are doing, is urgently needed. I thank you.

Décor comes from the French word “décorer,” which means “to decorate” (ultimately from the Latin word “decorare,” which means, “to beautify.”) “Décor” was first borrowed by stage designers, who modified its meaning to “stage design.” Arabs took the term and used it for both stage design and interior design. It is not used for graphic design.

What about TASMEEM DAKHILIYY? Will that fly? I remember raising such a question when I visited my friend Ali Al-Sinan in Cairo when he was studying at the College of Fine Arts, specializing in “décor.” It was the week Umm Kulthoom died, to be exact. Ali and his Egyptian classmates just shook their heads and giggled at my strange ideas.

Architecture is now referred to as MI”MAR. Architects like the term MUHANDIS MI”MARIYY, with a lot of justification, I think. It would be very difficult to take MUHANDIS away from them.


For “interior architecture” (whatever that is), I would suggest MI”MAR DAKHILIYY or TASMEEM MI”MARIYY DAKHILIYY.


Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-09-14 11:07:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have so far tried twice to post my answer in the answer box, but every time I pressed the \"send\" button, the answer came out truncated. This time I will try posting it in the \"Added Note\" box:

تصميم داخلي، معمار داخلي، تصميم معماري داخلي

I hope it comes out right this time.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thanks! Lots of helpful information!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1تصميم داخلي، معمFuad Yahya


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
تصميم داخلي، معم


Explanation:
In common Arabic usage, the term MUHANDIS is used for any profession in which geometry plays a great role. Architecture and interior design are such professions, where spatial dimensions, proportions, and relations are paramount. The artist or professional who engages in these activities is seen pouring over diagrams, using H2 pencils, proctors, T-rulers, triangles, compasses, and, these days, CAD software. These are the hallmark of HANDASA in the grand Arab tradition.

The term HANDASA also became the property of engineers, beginning with civil engineers, who share the geometric orientation with architects and designers. Now, all areas of engineering use the term, further contributing to the dulling of the term. I think that part of the problem is the use of the term MUHANDIS as an honorary title (BASH-MUHANDIS, in Egypt). The situation is not very different from the problem with term “doctor” in all languages. Originally, “doctor” simply meant “teacher,” and was mostly used for those who taught “doctrine,” that is, teachings of the Church. Now, of course, “doctor” is a dull-edged term, meaning “physician,” or “a holder of the highest academic degree in a certain area.” My sister is a doctor in nuclear physics, for instance. The appeal of the term comes from the prestige that the term carries.

I agree that MUHANDIS DةCOR may be less than fully satisfactory, but all imported, grafted terms reveal their unhappiness when you start peeling their skin. MUSAMMIM is probably a better choice for “designer,” if our reference point is contemporary Arabic. But if you start peeling its skin, you will see that the original meanings of the root S-M-M include “stopping a hole,” “deafness,” “determination,” “courage,” and so on. “Design” is a relatively recent extension of the sense of “determination.” In a sense, it means, “predetermination,” or “planning ahead.”

So as you can see, words change, sometimes not very rationally, and it is not always possible or even desirable to turn the clock back. In some cases, suggesting new terms, which is what you are doing, is urgently needed. I thank you.

Décor comes from the French word “décorer,” which means “to decorate” (ultimately from the Latin word “decorare,” which means, “to beautify.”) “Décor” was first borrowed by stage designers, who modified its meaning to “stage design.” Arabs took the term and used it for both stage design and interior design. It is not used for graphic design.

What about TASMEEM DAKHILIYY? Will that fly? I remember raising such a question when I visited my friend Ali Al-Sinan in Cairo when he was studying at the College of Fine Arts, specializing in “décor.” It was the week Umm Kulthoom died, to be exact. Ali and his Egyptian classmates just shook their heads and giggled at my strange ideas.

Architecture is now referred to as MI”MAR. Architects like the term MUHANDIS MI”MARIYY, with a lot of justification, I think. It would be very difficult to take MUHANDIS away from them.


For “interior architecture” (whatever that is), I would suggest MI”MAR DAKHILIYY or TASMEEM MI”MARIYY DAKHILIYY.


Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-09-14 11:07:14 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have so far tried twice to post my answer in the answer box, but every time I pressed the \"send\" button, the answer came out truncated. This time I will try posting it in the \"Added Note\" box:

تصميم داخلي، معمار داخلي، تصميم معماري داخلي

I hope it comes out right this time.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Thanks! Lots of helpful information!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
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Changes made by editors
Jan 2, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Field (specific)(none) » Architecture


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