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rivers

Arabic translation: الأنـهـار

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08:07 May 19, 2003
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
Geography / geography
English term or phrase: rivers
A friend is trying to find a relation of his origins and one of his surnames is Rivers in Spanish ( Rios ). He thinks that he may have an arab background
Marta
Arabic translation:الأنـهـار
Explanation:
This is the exact term in Arabic language for Rivers. River is نـهـر

َAs for the origins of names there is a multitude of specialized web sites which yr friend may consult.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 08:33:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Your friend may have a look if he wishes to the following URL:
The second one is particularly abour surnames origins & history:

http://www.behindthename.com/

http://www.intl-research.com/surname.htm
It has a very useful introduction:


SURNAMES
ORIGIN & HISTORY
European surnames first occurred between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries, with some patronymic surnames in Scandinavia being acquired as late as the nineteenth century. Prior to this time period, particularly during the \"Dark Ages\" between the fifth and eleventh centuries, people were largely illiterate, lived in rural areas or small villages, and had little need of distinction beyond their given names. During Biblical times people were often referred to by their given names and the locality in which they resided such as \"Jesus of Nazareth.\" However, as populations grew, the need to identify individuals by surnames became a necessity. The acquisition of surnames during the past eight hundred years has been affected by many factors, including social class and social structure, cultural tradition, and naming practices in neighboring cultures.
The majority of surnames are derived from patronymics, i.e. the forming of a surname from the father\'s given name such as Johnson, meaning literally \"the son of John.\" In some rare cases, the naming practice was metronymic, wherin the surname was derived from the mother\'s give name such as Catling, Marguerite or Dyott.
Other popular methods of origin for surnames are derived from place names or geographical names such as England, occupational names such as Smith or Carpenter in the British Isles; Schmidt or Zimmerman in Germany, etc. Less popular methods of surname origins include housenames such as Rothchild, surnames derived from nicknames of physical descriptions such as Blake or Hoch, or after one\'s character such as Stern or Gentile. In some cases an individual was named after a bird or an animal such as Lamb for a gentile or inoffensive person, while Fox was used for a person who was cunning. Surnames were also derived from anectodotal events such as Death and Leggatt, or seasons such as Winter and Spring, and status such as Bachelor, Knight and Squire.
Surname spelling and pronunciation has evolved over centuries, with our current generation often unaware of the origin and evolution of their surnames. Among the humbler classes of European society, and especially among the illiterate, individuals had little choice but to accept the mistakes of officials, clerks, and priests who officially bestowed upon them new versions of their surnames, just as they had meekly accepted the surnames which they were born with. In North America, the linguistic problems confronting immigration officials at Ellis Island in the 19th century were legendary as a prolific source of Anglicization. In the United States such processes of official and accidental change caused Bauch to become Baugh, Micsza to become McShea, Siminowicz to become Simmons, etc. Many immigrants deliberately Anglicized or changed their surnames upon arrival in the New World, so that Mlynar became Miller, Zimmerman became Carpenter, and Schwarz became Black.
Hence, regardless of the current spelling of your surname, the spelling and pronunciation of your surname has evolved over the centuries. In many cases, the current generation may be aware of the change. However, in many cases the change of the surname occurred so long ago that they are not aware of the original spelling and pronunciation of their surname. To the trained genealogist, the change or evolution of most surnames is obvious and very interesting, particularly to the bearer of that surname.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 08:36:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Arabs have had an almost eight centuries presence in Spain, & as such have considerably influenced Spanish culture & civilization.
Selected response from:

Agimus
France
Local time: 21:59
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6الأنـهـارAgimus


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
الأنـهـار


Explanation:
This is the exact term in Arabic language for Rivers. River is نـهـر

َAs for the origins of names there is a multitude of specialized web sites which yr friend may consult.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 08:33:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Your friend may have a look if he wishes to the following URL:
The second one is particularly abour surnames origins & history:

http://www.behindthename.com/

http://www.intl-research.com/surname.htm
It has a very useful introduction:


SURNAMES
ORIGIN & HISTORY
European surnames first occurred between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries, with some patronymic surnames in Scandinavia being acquired as late as the nineteenth century. Prior to this time period, particularly during the \"Dark Ages\" between the fifth and eleventh centuries, people were largely illiterate, lived in rural areas or small villages, and had little need of distinction beyond their given names. During Biblical times people were often referred to by their given names and the locality in which they resided such as \"Jesus of Nazareth.\" However, as populations grew, the need to identify individuals by surnames became a necessity. The acquisition of surnames during the past eight hundred years has been affected by many factors, including social class and social structure, cultural tradition, and naming practices in neighboring cultures.
The majority of surnames are derived from patronymics, i.e. the forming of a surname from the father\'s given name such as Johnson, meaning literally \"the son of John.\" In some rare cases, the naming practice was metronymic, wherin the surname was derived from the mother\'s give name such as Catling, Marguerite or Dyott.
Other popular methods of origin for surnames are derived from place names or geographical names such as England, occupational names such as Smith or Carpenter in the British Isles; Schmidt or Zimmerman in Germany, etc. Less popular methods of surname origins include housenames such as Rothchild, surnames derived from nicknames of physical descriptions such as Blake or Hoch, or after one\'s character such as Stern or Gentile. In some cases an individual was named after a bird or an animal such as Lamb for a gentile or inoffensive person, while Fox was used for a person who was cunning. Surnames were also derived from anectodotal events such as Death and Leggatt, or seasons such as Winter and Spring, and status such as Bachelor, Knight and Squire.
Surname spelling and pronunciation has evolved over centuries, with our current generation often unaware of the origin and evolution of their surnames. Among the humbler classes of European society, and especially among the illiterate, individuals had little choice but to accept the mistakes of officials, clerks, and priests who officially bestowed upon them new versions of their surnames, just as they had meekly accepted the surnames which they were born with. In North America, the linguistic problems confronting immigration officials at Ellis Island in the 19th century were legendary as a prolific source of Anglicization. In the United States such processes of official and accidental change caused Bauch to become Baugh, Micsza to become McShea, Siminowicz to become Simmons, etc. Many immigrants deliberately Anglicized or changed their surnames upon arrival in the New World, so that Mlynar became Miller, Zimmerman became Carpenter, and Schwarz became Black.
Hence, regardless of the current spelling of your surname, the spelling and pronunciation of your surname has evolved over the centuries. In many cases, the current generation may be aware of the change. However, in many cases the change of the surname occurred so long ago that they are not aware of the original spelling and pronunciation of their surname. To the trained genealogist, the change or evolution of most surnames is obvious and very interesting, particularly to the bearer of that surname.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 08:36:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Arabs have had an almost eight centuries presence in Spain, & as such have considerably influenced Spanish culture & civilization.

Agimus
France
Local time: 21:59
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Amer al-Azem: They say that 15-25% of Spanish is of Arabic origin! So now wonder!
4 mins
  -> U r perfectly right but Rivers as such sounds like of latin origin!

agree  Saleh Ayyub
1 hr
  -> Thanks Saleh

agree  Shazly
5 hrs
  -> Thank u Shazly

agree  muhammad turman
10 hrs
  -> Thanks Muhammad

agree  Ahmad Sa'adah
2 days1 hr

agree  AhmedAMS
173 days
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