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grandfather

Arabic translation: Address forms for various regions

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06:14 Mar 18, 2002
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: grandfather
i need to know all the expressions used to call "grandfather"(grandpa, granddad, etc.) in arabic written in english thanks
becky
Arabic translation:Address forms for various regions
Explanation:
In the Persian Gulf region, we typically say ABOOYI IL-"OWD (literally, "my big father").

In Egypt, as well as parts of Arabia that had been under Egyptian influence (before the modern state of Saudi Arabia), the typical expression is GIDDU (The G is hard, as in "good"). The expression literally means "his grandfather." The possessive shift(from "my" to "his") is a fascinating phenomenon, observed in Egypt, but most pronouncedly in the East Mediterranean region.

In the East Mediterranean region (Palestine, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon), the two common expressions are SEEDU and JIDDU. The first literally means "his master," which exhibits the same possessive shift that we saw earlier. JIDDU is the Levantine equivalent of the Egyptian GIDDU.

Grandmothers have sweeter and more interesting address forms than grandfathers, but that is for another question.


Fuad
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Fuad Yahya
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Summary of answers provided
4 +6"جد" = "jadd"Amer al-Azem
4 +3Address forms for various regionsFuad Yahya
4 +3some people in hijaz call granfather as elhabib eg. elhabib ahmad.xxxlavender


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
"جد" = "jadd"


Explanation:
Pronouced: "jad" = Standard Arabic
Or
"jaddo" = Colloqial/ slang

Amer al-Azem
Local time: 13:50
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in pair: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
1 hr
  -> Thanks Ahmed

agree  MEzzat
2 hrs
  -> Thanks MEzzat

agree  shfranke
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Stephen

agree  sandouk
10 hrs
  -> Thanks Sandouk

agree  Saleh Ayyub
11 hrs
  -> Thanks Saleh

agree  Alaa Zeineldine
14 hrs
  -> Thanks Alaa
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
some people in hijaz call granfather as elhabib eg. elhabib ahmad.


Explanation:
in hijaz area in saudi arabia granfathers have high respect , so they are mostly loved because they are to their grandsonsand grand daughters the symbol of love.

xxxlavender
Local time: 13:50

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  shfranke: Good cultural note; expresison also heard used in the Nejd and Nefud regions of SA
1 hr

agree  Amer al-Azem: I dont if that is true! I have been living in Hijaz area for 6 years so far. I never heard anyone saying that!! I hope to have further verification from Mr. Lavender. Thanks
2 hrs

agree  Saleh Ayyub
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Address forms for various regions


Explanation:
In the Persian Gulf region, we typically say ABOOYI IL-"OWD (literally, "my big father").

In Egypt, as well as parts of Arabia that had been under Egyptian influence (before the modern state of Saudi Arabia), the typical expression is GIDDU (The G is hard, as in "good"). The expression literally means "his grandfather." The possessive shift(from "my" to "his") is a fascinating phenomenon, observed in Egypt, but most pronouncedly in the East Mediterranean region.

In the East Mediterranean region (Palestine, Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon), the two common expressions are SEEDU and JIDDU. The first literally means "his master," which exhibits the same possessive shift that we saw earlier. JIDDU is the Levantine equivalent of the Egyptian GIDDU.

Grandmothers have sweeter and more interesting address forms than grandfathers, but that is for another question.


Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alaa Zeineldine
1 hr

agree  Safaa Roumani
16 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
8 days
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