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Salami

Arabic translation: سـََلامي

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Salami
Arabic translation:سـََلامي
Entered by: Mona Helal
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01:29 Jan 11, 2003
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
/ food items
English term or phrase: Salami
as in:
"try to limit fatty meats including sausages and delicatessen meats such as salami."

Thanks
Mona Helal
Local time: 06:49
سلامي، سجق أو نقانق السلامي
Explanation:
As far as "salami" goes, the same word is used in German, French, Italian, and Portuguese.

For your context, it may even be sufficient to use سجق or نقانق if the client would approve, based on the message they are trying to deliver.

Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-13 07:59:50 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Is it M or N? Well, those who like it say ummm, yummy! So perhaps it is M.

The truth is that the stuff is simply not native to where I grew up. The first time I tried it was about 15 years ago, when I had an Irish girlfriend who liked an amazing assortment of ungodly meats with her eggs. I just never cared for it.

I grew up eating such delicacies as locusts. The United Nations put an end to that, spraying the locust swarms with pesticide, and killing some of my playmates in the process (locust vendors were not so scrupulous).

In short, it is a relatively foreign food to me, perhaps not as foreign as sloppy joe, but the name of it is definitely acquired. Al-Mawrid EA lists NAQANIQ, while in the AE volume, MAQANIQ is explained as NAQANIQ, while NAQANIQ is explained as LAQANIQ and MAQANIQ!

Hans Weher lists NAQANIQ as a Syrian term. MAQANIQ is also listed as a Syian term and is explained as NAQANIQ.

That is too many qafs in one word for my taste.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Shukran Ya Fuad, but shouldn't that be مقانق not نقانق?
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6سلامي، سجق أو نقانق السلاميFuad Yahya


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
سلامي، سجق أو نقانق السلامي


Explanation:
As far as "salami" goes, the same word is used in German, French, Italian, and Portuguese.

For your context, it may even be sufficient to use سجق or نقانق if the client would approve, based on the message they are trying to deliver.

Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-13 07:59:50 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Is it M or N? Well, those who like it say ummm, yummy! So perhaps it is M.

The truth is that the stuff is simply not native to where I grew up. The first time I tried it was about 15 years ago, when I had an Irish girlfriend who liked an amazing assortment of ungodly meats with her eggs. I just never cared for it.

I grew up eating such delicacies as locusts. The United Nations put an end to that, spraying the locust swarms with pesticide, and killing some of my playmates in the process (locust vendors were not so scrupulous).

In short, it is a relatively foreign food to me, perhaps not as foreign as sloppy joe, but the name of it is definitely acquired. Al-Mawrid EA lists NAQANIQ, while in the AE volume, MAQANIQ is explained as NAQANIQ, while NAQANIQ is explained as LAQANIQ and MAQANIQ!

Hans Weher lists NAQANIQ as a Syrian term. MAQANIQ is also listed as a Syian term and is explained as NAQANIQ.

That is too many qafs in one word for my taste.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Shukran Ya Fuad, but shouldn't that be مقانق not نقانق?

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  HALAHouse
7 hrs

agree  Saleh Ayyub: Yum .. I mean yes
9 hrs

agree  muhammad turman
15 hrs

agree  Adam Zakrzewski
1 day15 hrs

agree  sarsam
2 days25 mins

agree  AhmedAMS
353 days
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