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نظرية توازن القوى

Arabic translation: equilibrium

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13:09 Jun 21, 2003
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: نظرية توازن القوى
كان للإتحاد السوفيتي دورا في المحافظة على نظرية توازن القوى في العالم
xxxNaela Al-Ene
Arabic translation:equilibrium
Explanation:
I agree with Sami, and sometimes the word "equilibrium" is used.

Take care.

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Note added at 2003-06-21 13:27:35 (GMT)
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Please check this as a reference to what I mentioned:

system of international relations in which nations seek to maintain an approximate equilibrium of power among many rivals, thus preventing the preponderance of any one state. Crucial to the system is a willingness on the part of individual national governments to change alliances as the situation demands in order to maintain the balance. Thucydides’ description of Greece in the 5th cent. B.C. and Guicciardini’s description of 15th-century Italy are early illustrations. Its modern development began in the mid-17th cent., when it was directed against the France of Louis XIV. Balance of power was the stated British objective for much of the 18th and 19th cent., and it characterized the European international system, for example, from 1815–1914. After World War I the balance of power system was attacked by proponents of cooperation and a community of power. International relations were changed radically after World War II by the predominance of two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, with major ideological differences between them, but this ended with the collapse of the USSR in 1991. 1
See H. J. Morgenthau, Politics Among Nations (1960); H. Butterfield and M. Wright, ed., Diplomatic Investigations (1966); P. Keal, Unspoken Rules and Superpower Dominance (1984); R. J. Lieber, No Common Power: Understanding International Relations (1988).
Selected response from:

mutarjem
Local time: 20:19
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3Balance of Power Theory
Sami Khamou
5equilibrium
mutarjem


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Balance of Power Theory


Explanation:
Balance of Power Theory

or

Theory of Balance of Power

Sami Khamou
Local time: 14:19
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in pair: 806

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  htms
2 hrs
  -> Thank you HTMS

agree  Fuad Yahya
3 hrs
  -> Thank you Fuad

agree  ALI HASAN
6 hrs
  -> Thank you Ali
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
equilibrium


Explanation:
I agree with Sami, and sometimes the word "equilibrium" is used.

Take care.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-21 13:27:35 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please check this as a reference to what I mentioned:

system of international relations in which nations seek to maintain an approximate equilibrium of power among many rivals, thus preventing the preponderance of any one state. Crucial to the system is a willingness on the part of individual national governments to change alliances as the situation demands in order to maintain the balance. Thucydides’ description of Greece in the 5th cent. B.C. and Guicciardini’s description of 15th-century Italy are early illustrations. Its modern development began in the mid-17th cent., when it was directed against the France of Louis XIV. Balance of power was the stated British objective for much of the 18th and 19th cent., and it characterized the European international system, for example, from 1815–1914. After World War I the balance of power system was attacked by proponents of cooperation and a community of power. International relations were changed radically after World War II by the predominance of two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, with major ideological differences between them, but this ended with the collapse of the USSR in 1991. 1
See H. J. Morgenthau, Politics Among Nations (1960); H. Butterfield and M. Wright, ed., Diplomatic Investigations (1966); P. Keal, Unspoken Rules and Superpower Dominance (1984); R. J. Lieber, No Common Power: Understanding International Relations (1988).


mutarjem
Local time: 20:19
Native speaker of: Arabic
PRO pts in pair: 86
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