KudoZ home » English to Farsi (Persian) » Art/Literary

I am running, I am thinking, I am thirsty, I am tired

Farsi (Persian) translation: midavam; fekr mikonam; teshne'am; khaste'am

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:I am running, I am thinking, I am thirsty, I am tired
Farsi (Persian) translation:midavam; fekr mikonam; teshne'am; khaste'am
Entered by: Mollanazar
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

23:51 May 14, 2002
English to Farsi (Persian) translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary / grammar and linguistics
English term or phrase: I am running, I am thinking, I am thirsty, I am tired
I was recently introduced to Farsi in a linguistics course. I am researching verb forms. A translation to Farsi using the phenetic or english alphabets would be greatly appreciated
Dimitra Zalarvis-Chase
midavam; fekr mikonam; teshne'am; khaste'am
Explanation:
1) The word 'dAram' can precede the verbs 'midavam' and 'fekr 'mikonam' to stress the continuity of the action. This is a new feature added to Modern Persian grammar, though it was common in colloquial language. This kind of continuous tense in Persian is called "mozare-ye malmus" or for the past continuous tense we use "dAshtam" and call the tense as "mAzi-ye malmus ('tangible')".

2) There is no need to use 'man' ('I') as the subject in unmarked utterances because the ending "-am", present at the end of the verbs, refers to the subject.

Best regards

Selected response from:

Mollanazar
Iran
Local time: 05:44
Grading comment
wow! great information! Just what I was looking for. Thank you so much for taking the time to explain the extra details regarding common use. Have a great day!

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5midavam; fekr mikonam; teshne'am; khaste'am
Mollanazar
5man (doram) midavam, man (doram) fikr mikunam, man tashnayam, man khastyamM. R. Rahimi


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
man (doram) midavam, man (doram) fikr mikunam, man tashnayam, man khastyam


Explanation:

The last two may also translate as "man tasnah hastam" "man khasta hastam" or "man khastah shudam"

Good luck!

M. R. Rahimi
Local time: 06:14
Native speaker of: Native in TajikTajik, Native in RussianRussian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
midavam; fekr mikonam; teshne'am; khaste'am


Explanation:
1) The word 'dAram' can precede the verbs 'midavam' and 'fekr 'mikonam' to stress the continuity of the action. This is a new feature added to Modern Persian grammar, though it was common in colloquial language. This kind of continuous tense in Persian is called "mozare-ye malmus" or for the past continuous tense we use "dAshtam" and call the tense as "mAzi-ye malmus ('tangible')".

2) There is no need to use 'man' ('I') as the subject in unmarked utterances because the ending "-am", present at the end of the verbs, refers to the subject.

Best regards



Mollanazar
Iran
Local time: 05:44
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
PRO pts in pair: 97
Grading comment
wow! great information! Just what I was looking for. Thank you so much for taking the time to explain the extra details regarding common use. Have a great day!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search