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blob & pellet

French translation: des épaisseurs

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08:37 Apr 3, 2007
English to French translations [PRO]
Archaeology / Numismatique
English term or phrase: blob & pellet
Bonjour
Sur des anciennes pièces de monnaie (IIe siècle av. J C)
l'identification des motifs est " a horse, blobs and pellets"
je pense qu'en numismatique blob se traduirait par globule mais je ne suis pas sure et je ne trouve pas pour "pellet", y- aurait-il des experts pouvant m'aider ?
Merci
BC45
Local time: 23:23
French translation:des épaisseurs
Explanation:

le mot "Bourrelet" donné par STL me semble convenir mais pas placé en bordure puisqu'il s'agit de motifs de la pièce lorsqu'il n'y a pas d'effigie

The First Coin

The most fundamental debate involving these coins is whether the Lydian Lion is in fact the world's first true coin. Much here depends on what definition you use for "coin." I'm using a commonly held numismatic definition of what a coin is, which is spelled out well in Webster, Second Edition: "A piece of metal (or, rarely, of some other material) certified by a mark or marks upon it to be of a definite exchange value and issued by governmental authority to be used as money." Key here are "mark or marks" and "certified ... by government authority."

Other electrum pieces without a pictorial design but instead with an empty field, pellets, striations, parallel lines, or crisscrossing lines across their obverse were minted at about the same times as Lydian Lions.[14]Colin M. Kraay,[15]E.S.G. Robinson,[16]Charles Seltman,[17]and others have argued that these aren't true coins, only precoins, because they lack an essential feature of coins -- a "type," or mark, of a recognized issuing authority, which in the case of these coins is a roaring lion.[18]

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Note added at 2 heures (2007-04-03 11:01:22 GMT)
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http://jfbradu.free.fr/celtes/burdigala/or.htm
Selected response from:

Lidija Lazic
Local time: 00:23
Grading comment
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4pellet > listelSTL
3des épaisseursLidija Lazic


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pellet > listel


Explanation:
Le listel est la "bordure de la pièce formant un bourrelet circulaire"


    Reference: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossaire_de_la_numismatique
STL
Local time: 00:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I don't doubt that, but I still find it an unlikely translation for 'pellet' — do you have anything to relate the one to the other?
25 mins
  -> listel is a technical word and I guess that if the text is meant for specialists it may not be a problem for them. By the way, "bourrelet" may be a suitable word.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
des épaisseurs


Explanation:

le mot "Bourrelet" donné par STL me semble convenir mais pas placé en bordure puisqu'il s'agit de motifs de la pièce lorsqu'il n'y a pas d'effigie

The First Coin

The most fundamental debate involving these coins is whether the Lydian Lion is in fact the world's first true coin. Much here depends on what definition you use for "coin." I'm using a commonly held numismatic definition of what a coin is, which is spelled out well in Webster, Second Edition: "A piece of metal (or, rarely, of some other material) certified by a mark or marks upon it to be of a definite exchange value and issued by governmental authority to be used as money." Key here are "mark or marks" and "certified ... by government authority."

Other electrum pieces without a pictorial design but instead with an empty field, pellets, striations, parallel lines, or crisscrossing lines across their obverse were minted at about the same times as Lydian Lions.[14]Colin M. Kraay,[15]E.S.G. Robinson,[16]Charles Seltman,[17]and others have argued that these aren't true coins, only precoins, because they lack an essential feature of coins -- a "type," or mark, of a recognized issuing authority, which in the case of these coins is a roaring lion.[18]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 heures (2007-04-03 11:01:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://jfbradu.free.fr/celtes/burdigala/or.htm

Lidija Lazic
Local time: 00:23
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SerbianSerbian
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  STL: il serait peut être bon d'avoir une image de ladite pièce
45 mins
  -> il n'y en a pas beaucoup, on trouve surtout celles qui sont déjà poinçonnées
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