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the carnivalised world

French translation: carnavalesque / carnavalisé

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:carnivalised
French translation:carnavalesque / carnavalisé
Entered by: newenham
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00:30 Oct 25, 2002
English to French translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: the carnivalised world
In terms of content, too, elements of high culture and idealism clash with the material and bodily stratum, the carnivalised world, as it was called by Bakhtin, where the dark and usually hidden aspects of life come to the fore.

[article about a graphic artist]

"un monde carnavalisé" (néologisme) ou "un monde carnavalesque" (mot existant)?
newenham
Local time: 21:58
le monde carnavalesque
Explanation:
The term carnival came to have particular prominence for literary criticism after the publication of Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and his World (1965; translated by Helene Iswolsky [Indiana University Press, 1984]). In this book, Rabelais’ writing is seen as drawing its energies from the historic practices of carnival which preceded and surrounded it in Renaissance Europe. Bakhtin gives an especially benign account of carnival rituals, in which the time of carnival features as an utopian irruption into the workaday world, a time of feasting when normally dominant constraints and hierarchies are temporarily lifted. The subversive and anti-authoritarian aspects of carnival are here emphasised – authority figures are mocked, the joyless routines of everyday life are abrogated, the lower bodily strata are allowed both to degrade and to regenerate those conceptions of the world which seek to exclude them. Rabelais’ writings, and those of his near contemporaries Cervantes and Shakespeare, are seen as drawing their energies from these carnival practices, and from the epochally established view of the world which they embody. In this specific sense, in which there is a direct connection between historically-existing carnival practices and artistic forms which reproduce them, their writing can be described as “carnivalesque”.
Bakhtin extends the idea very significantly, however, in the notion of “carnivalised” writing which succeeds these Renaissance models and thus long outlives the actual historical location of the practices from which such writing takes it name. Carnivalised writing is that writing which mobilises one form of discourse against another, especially popular against elite forms. In this usage, “carnival” tends to lose its historical specificity and comes to resemble a transhistorical generic principle which can be actualised in widely differing periods; it is present in the Menippean satires of the ancient world and also in the novels of Dostoevsky, written in a society having little contact with historic Renaissance carnivals.

Johannisnacht - ... to some extent 'life turned inside out,' 'the reverse side of the world' ('monde à l'envers')".3 Bakhtin also stresses that at the center of carnival lies ...
http://www.dickinson.edu/glossen/heft15/shafi.html

BARATTO (Anna) épouse FONTES 18436 LE RECUEIL RETROUVE : LES ¸ ... - ... Référence : 89PA030121 - Université de soutenance : Paris 3 726 pages. GARRIDO (Jean-Pierre Janv) 18110 L'AVENTURE CARNAVALISEE DANS LES POEMES ...
http://www.anrtheses.com.fr/Catalogue/SCat_2542.htm Search within this site

Discovering the Carnivalesque: Web Links - ... No commercial or corporate sponsorships of Mardi Gras parades ... AUDIO TOURS (w/visual tour) OF MARTI GRAS ... AUTHOR INFORMATION AND ONLINE BOOKS. What Hath Bakhtin ...
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~nmueller/grmn247/links.html

http://www.usherb.ca/flsh/dlc/doss-ped/lit/dplit.html
... et séditieuses. Par l'effet d'un renversement grotesque, le monde
carnavalesque est l'envers d'un monde imposé. Selon Bakhtine ...
http://www.usherbrooke.ca/flsh/dlc/doss-ped/lit/lit726.html [More results from www.usherbrooke.ca]




Selected response from:

Deb Phillips
Grading comment
Thank you!
Apparently both terms are used, so I'd rather use the existing word, especially since it's used in French in your references and the neologism is not.
Your references are also interesting because the author of the article I'm translating refers to Rabelais and Bakhtin independently. Maybe his knowledge of Rabelais comes from Bakhtin?

[ Actually I'd rather give points to all the people who responded, since all answers have been useful to me, but I guess that's not possible on proz.com... so thanks to you all... ]
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1le monde carnavalesqueDeb Phillips
3 +1Pas plus instruite
Claudia Iglesias
3 +1le monde carnavaliséALAIN COTE


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
le monde carnavalisé


Explanation:
Simple suggestion, en attendant que des collègues plus instruits que moi en la matière n'entrent en scène. :)

Tout profane que je sois, je constate que ce néologisme est assez répandu sur des sites sérieux qui traitent d'art. On pourrait toujours opter pour "le monde passé à l'état carnavalesque", mais ça me semble un peu lourd.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-25 00:57:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dupas, Jean-Claude. \"L\'excentricité d\'un discours carnavalisé.\" L\'excentricité en Grande-Bretagne au XVlIle siècle. Ed. Michèle Plaisant.

Un monde carnavalisé où les rôles ne cessent de s\'échanger,
victimes et tortionnaires indiscernables. Ainsi, le ...
www.theatre-contemporain.net/mousson/mousson2000/ journal/27aout2000/impression.htm

Cahiers du CREPAL
... O. KLEIMAN, Coimbra, le mythe carnavalisé. AM QUINT, Les masques de la ville
dans la littérature pastorale portugaise (XVIe-XVIIe siècles). ...
www.scd.univ-paris3.fr/Por_CRE1.htm

ALAIN COTE
Local time: 04:58
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 280

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  IlonaT
20 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Pas plus instruite


Explanation:
Ni avec beaucoup d'arguments, je penche pour carnavalesque, parce que j'ai l'impression que c'est le côté mascarade qu'a travaillé Bakhtin et que la terminaison "-esque" me semble transmettre cet connotation un peu péjorative (juste une question d'oreille)

SPA 545 CONCEPTS OF LITERARY CRITICISM
... Carnaval~cross-dressing Carnaval~saturnalia Carnaval~bodas fingidas. Parodia: Ironía
consciente o una evoación sardónica de un modelo artístico. En Bakhtin ...
www.public.asu.edu/~sev1987/ Aproximaciones_Bakhtin.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-25 01:08:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh !!!

CETTE, bien sûr !

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-25 01:09:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh !!!

CETTE, bien sûr !

Claudia Iglesias
Chile
Local time: 16:58
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 320

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JCEC
2 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
le monde carnavalesque


Explanation:
The term carnival came to have particular prominence for literary criticism after the publication of Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and his World (1965; translated by Helene Iswolsky [Indiana University Press, 1984]). In this book, Rabelais’ writing is seen as drawing its energies from the historic practices of carnival which preceded and surrounded it in Renaissance Europe. Bakhtin gives an especially benign account of carnival rituals, in which the time of carnival features as an utopian irruption into the workaday world, a time of feasting when normally dominant constraints and hierarchies are temporarily lifted. The subversive and anti-authoritarian aspects of carnival are here emphasised – authority figures are mocked, the joyless routines of everyday life are abrogated, the lower bodily strata are allowed both to degrade and to regenerate those conceptions of the world which seek to exclude them. Rabelais’ writings, and those of his near contemporaries Cervantes and Shakespeare, are seen as drawing their energies from these carnival practices, and from the epochally established view of the world which they embody. In this specific sense, in which there is a direct connection between historically-existing carnival practices and artistic forms which reproduce them, their writing can be described as “carnivalesque”.
Bakhtin extends the idea very significantly, however, in the notion of “carnivalised” writing which succeeds these Renaissance models and thus long outlives the actual historical location of the practices from which such writing takes it name. Carnivalised writing is that writing which mobilises one form of discourse against another, especially popular against elite forms. In this usage, “carnival” tends to lose its historical specificity and comes to resemble a transhistorical generic principle which can be actualised in widely differing periods; it is present in the Menippean satires of the ancient world and also in the novels of Dostoevsky, written in a society having little contact with historic Renaissance carnivals.

Johannisnacht - ... to some extent 'life turned inside out,' 'the reverse side of the world' ('monde à l'envers')".3 Bakhtin also stresses that at the center of carnival lies ...
http://www.dickinson.edu/glossen/heft15/shafi.html

BARATTO (Anna) épouse FONTES 18436 LE RECUEIL RETROUVE : LES ¸ ... - ... Référence : 89PA030121 - Université de soutenance : Paris 3 726 pages. GARRIDO (Jean-Pierre Janv) 18110 L'AVENTURE CARNAVALISEE DANS LES POEMES ...
http://www.anrtheses.com.fr/Catalogue/SCat_2542.htm Search within this site

Discovering the Carnivalesque: Web Links - ... No commercial or corporate sponsorships of Mardi Gras parades ... AUDIO TOURS (w/visual tour) OF MARTI GRAS ... AUTHOR INFORMATION AND ONLINE BOOKS. What Hath Bakhtin ...
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~nmueller/grmn247/links.html

http://www.usherb.ca/flsh/dlc/doss-ped/lit/dplit.html
... et séditieuses. Par l'effet d'un renversement grotesque, le monde
carnavalesque est l'envers d'un monde imposé. Selon Bakhtine ...
http://www.usherbrooke.ca/flsh/dlc/doss-ped/lit/lit726.html [More results from www.usherbrooke.ca]






Deb Phillips
PRO pts in pair: 16
Grading comment
Thank you!
Apparently both terms are used, so I'd rather use the existing word, especially since it's used in French in your references and the neologism is not.
Your references are also interesting because the author of the article I'm translating refers to Rabelais and Bakhtin independently. Maybe his knowledge of Rabelais comes from Bakhtin?

[ Actually I'd rather give points to all the people who responded, since all answers have been useful to me, but I guess that's not possible on proz.com... so thanks to you all... ]

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JCEC
3 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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