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PT and CT ratios

French translation: rapports de TP et TC [or: TI]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:PT and CT ratios
French translation:rapports de TP et TC [or: TI]
Entered by: Tony M
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10:21 Apr 25, 2008
English to French translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng
English term or phrase: PT and CT ratios
The whole sentence is: Many of the Power Meter module's setup registers are configured when the meter is initially put into service, although the device cannot operate properly until the Volts Mode and PT and CT ratios are set. I have seen on the internet that PT and CT are used very often, but I can't find what they stand for in this context (power meter). Thanks.
lauremar
Italy
Local time: 11:54
rapports de TP et TI
Explanation:
I'm very sure about the meaning of the EN abbreviations, but not quite so sure about the FR terms.

PT = power transformer (used to measure the voltage delivered)

CT = current transformer (used to measure the current drawn)

These 2 measurements are needed to calculate the power delivered, and hence, the energy consumed.

In FR, I believe they are referred to as 'transformateur de puissance / d'intensité' respectively (and I think if you search here on those terms, you'll even find they've come up before, which might help you confirm them)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-04-25 14:10:46 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

I totally take BA's point about 'transformateur de puissance' being wrong, and that it should be 'transformateur de potentiel' (which feels much better to my mind). However, for the record, at least one of my clients positively insists that it is 'puissance', despite all my protests.

Either way, PT > TP seems to be OK anyway, and I think TC or TI can both be used, at least on the evidence of the docs that have passed through my hands.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:54
Grading comment
Yes, that is definitely it. For the frenche Transformateur de tension (TT) and Transformateur de courant (TC) seem to be most used. Thanks a lot!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1rapports de TP et de TC
Bernard Arsenault
2rapports de TP et TI
Tony M


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pt and ct ratios
rapports de TP et de TC


Language variant: rapports de transformation des TP et des TC

Explanation:
These are measuring transformers used to measure power (voltage ("potential") and current) in power conductors, using a known transformation ratio between the input and the output.

In French, PT (potential transformer) becomes TP (transformateur de potentiel) and CT (current transformer) becomes TC (transformateur de courant).

Bernard Arsenault
Canada
Local time: 05:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 74

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I have seen both, Bernard, but one of my European clients who specializes in power metering definitely prefers TI; as for the P = potential, yes, i think you're absolutely right there, although again, I have come across the 'puissance' variant too.
1 hr
  -> Thank you Tony - your client might want to use the strict sense of "current" (Intensité) but "courant" is generally used for this acronym. A "transformateur de puissance" is a totally different animal!
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
rapports de TP et TI


Explanation:
I'm very sure about the meaning of the EN abbreviations, but not quite so sure about the FR terms.

PT = power transformer (used to measure the voltage delivered)

CT = current transformer (used to measure the current drawn)

These 2 measurements are needed to calculate the power delivered, and hence, the energy consumed.

In FR, I believe they are referred to as 'transformateur de puissance / d'intensité' respectively (and I think if you search here on those terms, you'll even find they've come up before, which might help you confirm them)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2008-04-25 14:10:46 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

I totally take BA's point about 'transformateur de puissance' being wrong, and that it should be 'transformateur de potentiel' (which feels much better to my mind). However, for the record, at least one of my clients positively insists that it is 'puissance', despite all my protests.

Either way, PT > TP seems to be OK anyway, and I think TC or TI can both be used, at least on the evidence of the docs that have passed through my hands.

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1343
Grading comment
Yes, that is definitely it. For the frenche Transformateur de tension (TT) and Transformateur de courant (TC) seem to be most used. Thanks a lot!
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Changes made by editors
Apr 25, 2008 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/43551">lauremar's</a> old entry - "PT and CT ratios" » "rapports de TP et TI"


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