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French translation: BIN = Numéro d\'Identification de Banque

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:BIN = Bank Identification Number [NB: obsolete term]
French translation:BIN = Numéro d\'Identification de Banque
Entered by: Tony M
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

22:19 Jul 9, 2013
English to French translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / Bancaire, SEPA
English term or phrase: bin
The credit card number can have maximum 19 characters.
Please enter: bin, pan, masked or full credit card number.
Jeanne Talcone
France
Local time: 09:08
BIN = Numéro d'Identification de Banque
Explanation:
So few Google hits, I'm very unsure of this; but check out a quick Google search along these lines.

Whatever, the acronym 'BIN' seems to be used in FR anyway (just like BIC? IBAN, etc.)

Nom de la Banque de carte de crédit ? - assistance technique

fr.softuses.com/166170‎

... carte de crédit est connu comme le numéro d'Identification de banque (ou BIN). ... communs : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bank_Identification_Num...


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Note added at 9 mins (2013-07-09 22:29:19 GMT)
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Here's the EN info:

Bank card number - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number‎

a six-digit Issuer Identification Number (IIN) (previously called the "Bank Identification Number" (BIN)) the first digit of which is the Major Industry Identifier (MII), ...
‎Major Industry Identifier (MII) - ‎Issuer identification number (IIN) - ‎Other codes

and plenty of other Ghits...

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Note added at 12 mins (2013-07-09 22:31:40 GMT)
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This ref. mentions the number that superseded it, the IIN:

Numéro D'identification De Banque - Qwika

wikipedia.qwika.com › Français › en.wikipedia.org‎

A Numéro D'identification De Banque (CASIER) est les six premiers chiffres de a carte de ... Le terme "numéro d'identification d'émetteur" (IIN) remplace "le numéro .... Français > en.wikipedia.org

Ah, but that looks like an MT version of the EN article, so probably not to be relied upon...

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Note added at 11 hrs (2013-07-10 10:03:42 GMT)
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It is not our job as translators to correct or update our source texts. If a source text uses a particular term, and the equivalent term is valid in the target language, then we should use it; it is simply not within our remit to say "Ah, but if the person had been writing this today, they'd have said ... instead"

Here, we don't have enough context to know why the writer wrote this; there could well be something in the wider source text to explain why they were specifically quoting the obsolete term; or it could be that this is a 'historical' (!) text in some way.

It amounts to overinterpretation to extrapolate from the source text on the basis of our own knowledge.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 09:08
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1numéro d'émetteur
Joëlle Bouille
2 +2BIN = Numéro d'Identification de Banque
Tony M


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
BIN = Bank Identification Number
BIN = Numéro d'Identification de Banque


Explanation:
So few Google hits, I'm very unsure of this; but check out a quick Google search along these lines.

Whatever, the acronym 'BIN' seems to be used in FR anyway (just like BIC? IBAN, etc.)

Nom de la Banque de carte de crédit ? - assistance technique

fr.softuses.com/166170‎

... carte de crédit est connu comme le numéro d'Identification de banque (ou BIN). ... communs : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bank_Identification_Num...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2013-07-09 22:29:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's the EN info:

Bank card number - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number‎

a six-digit Issuer Identification Number (IIN) (previously called the "Bank Identification Number" (BIN)) the first digit of which is the Major Industry Identifier (MII), ...
‎Major Industry Identifier (MII) - ‎Issuer identification number (IIN) - ‎Other codes

and plenty of other Ghits...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2013-07-09 22:31:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This ref. mentions the number that superseded it, the IIN:

Numéro D'identification De Banque - Qwika

wikipedia.qwika.com › Français › en.wikipedia.org‎

A Numéro D'identification De Banque (CASIER) est les six premiers chiffres de a carte de ... Le terme "numéro d'identification d'émetteur" (IIN) remplace "le numéro .... Français > en.wikipedia.org

Ah, but that looks like an MT version of the EN article, so probably not to be relied upon...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2013-07-10 10:03:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is not our job as translators to correct or update our source texts. If a source text uses a particular term, and the equivalent term is valid in the target language, then we should use it; it is simply not within our remit to say "Ah, but if the person had been writing this today, they'd have said ... instead"

Here, we don't have enough context to know why the writer wrote this; there could well be something in the wider source text to explain why they were specifically quoting the obsolete term; or it could be that this is a 'historical' (!) text in some way.

It amounts to overinterpretation to extrapolate from the source text on the basis of our own knowledge.

Tony M
France
Local time: 09:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cyril B.: BIN as is
2 hrs
  -> Merci, Cyril ! Yes, indeed!

agree  Daryo: must be that; OTOH it's not often requested usually a sort code and account number is enough (at least in UK)
9 hrs
  -> Thanks! This is specifically to do with the ISO/IEC standard credit card numbering
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
BIN > IIN
numéro d'émetteur


Explanation:
Dans le glossaire multilingue que j'ai déjà posté pour l'une de vos questions, Jeanne (http://www.massifcentral.banquepopulaire.fr/pdf/glossaire_mu... on trouve page 157 :

"Numéro d’identification unique et international dont le registre est tenu par l’American Bankers Association par délégation de l’ISO."

Sur https://www.bindb.com/, on trouve :

"Bank identification number - credit card bin lookup
Issuer identification number is the first six digits of a card number"

L'American Bankers Association utilise donc "Bank identification number" et "Issuer identification number" pour désigner la même chose.

Sur http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_7812, on trouve :

"ISO/IEC 7812 Identification cards — Identification of issuers was first published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1989.
[...]
The registration authority of assigned IINs is the American National Standards Institute (ANSI),[3] but previously it was the American Bankers Association."

Voir donc : http://www.ansi.org/other_services/registration_programs/iin... (Issuer Identification Number (IIN) Fact Sheet of the ANSI)

Et en français : https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carte_de_paiement

"Le numéro de carte est selon la norme internationale ISO/IEC 7812 :

- six chiffres pour le numéro d'émetteur (IIN pour Issuer Identification Number autrefois BIN, Bank Identification Number) dont le premier est le Major Industry Identifier (MII), entre 4 et 6 pour les banques"


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Note added at 9 hrs (2013-07-10 07:21:43 GMT)
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About Tony's comment, saying "IIN superseded the BIN, but is not identical to it; so it is possible using the new term might cause confusion".

The whole point for standards is normalization (which is definitely not a strong suit for English and its many redundancies). It is obviously the point for standard ISO/IEC 7812 as well.

The new IIN has 6 numbers. The old American BIN had 4 to 6 numbers.
See http://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bank-identification-numb...

Does it make them different??? No. It doesn't.
This is all but a matter of programming (I worked 7 years as a programmer, btw).

When writing software, every variable used has first to be defined. This basically means defining whether it's a number, or an alphabetical field, and how long it can be.
This allows subsequently checking whether the data typed in by users is correct or not.

So Americans first defined a 4 to 6 digits "variable" and now we use a 6 digits IIN?
From a programming perspective, it doesn't make any difference. You just define a 6 digits variable and perform any validation that might be required for, say, banks still having a 4 or 5 digits IIN, in the coding.

ALL THE USER HAS TO WORRY ABOUT is entering the IIN (no matter its length: this is handled in the coding!).

What does promote confusion is keeping on using obsolete terms when the context doesn't so require, or using 10 different words to say the exact same thing like English likes to do. It's perfect for writing songs, love letters, poetry and literature. It's less handy when the point is to normalize.

Besides, from a French perspective, whether you talk about the BIN or the IIN of a credit card, you talk about the "numéro d'émetteur".

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Note added at 3 days17 hrs (2013-07-13 15:46:41 GMT) Post-grading
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So this interface only accepts credit cards issued by banks? Not by other issuers?

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Note added at 3 days17 hrs (2013-07-13 15:51:01 GMT) Post-grading
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@Tony: about overinterpretation

When it's obvious from the context that a source is inaccurate/imprecise, I just tell the client, and they usually agree to correct mistakes. Who wouldn't?

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Note added at 3 days17 hrs (2013-07-13 15:53:48 GMT) Post-grading
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And this is not 'historical'. It's an input field in a user interface.

Joëlle Bouille
Belgium
Local time: 09:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 143

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: According to the EN references I found, this IIN superseded the BIN, but is not identical to it; so it is possible using the new term might cause confusion; e.g. if one had to say "the BIN was replaced by the IIN", your suggestion wouldn't work.
2 mins
  -> Just read my answer. The American Bankers Association itself uses both terms on the home page of its BIN database. The only context where BIN should still be used is indeed when explaining it was replaced. This is not the case here.

agree  Daryo: well explained!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Daryo :-)
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Changes made by editors
Jul 13, 2013 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/682366">Jeanne Talcone's</a> old entry - "bin" » "BIN = Numéro d\'Identification de Banque"


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