KudoZ home » English to French » Food & Drink

Cooked tea

French translation: souper (léger)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
11:18 Mar 7, 2007
English to French translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
English term or phrase: Cooked tea
Cooked tea

No more context

Thanks
Fabrice Brunon
France
Local time: 18:18
French translation:souper (léger)
Explanation:
It's a very English institution that has no exact FR equivalent, so you'll probably have to invent a term, depending on how it has to be used!

'tea' is usually what we eat at 5 o'c, with cake, sandwiches, etc. Sometimes, an mainly in the odlen days, we would use 'tea' to refer to the meal of the evning that would be 'souper' in FR — assuming that the main meal of the day 'dinner' had been taken at 'dinner time', i.e. noon; this is something of a class difference, where working class families would eat 'dinner' at midday and 'tea' in the evening, whereas middle- or upper-class families would eat 'luncheon' at midday and 'dinner' in the evening.

Now a 'cooked tea' would be something more substantial, say with eggs on toast, or some other kind of hot savoury 'snack'.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2007-03-07 11:38:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although it would indeed be the 'repas du soir', it is probably not a full meal, more like just one hot dish...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:18
Grading comment
Thanks Tony, I was kind of hoping there was a 'standard' translation but your explanation and your translation helped me a great deal. Thanks a bunch :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1souper (léger)
Tony M
4repas du soirkatsy
3un 5 o'clock chaudMelzie
3 -1dînerxxxPFB


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cooked tea
repas du soir


Explanation:
pas très élégant.... mais je comprends que c'est le repas 'tea', dont on précise que c'est un repas chaud (comme un dîner), plutôt que 'bread and butter and cakes', probablement 'a fry-up', e.g. sausage, egg and chips. Pour moi ça évoque un repas des classes ouvrières britanniques , jusqu'à au moins la fin des années 60. Richard Hoggart, dans 'The Uses of Literacy' en parle avec éloquence
C'es

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2007-03-07 11:32:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here's a quote from above book (published 1957), about working classes 'I used to notice in the flusher early years of married life my relatives were often frying at tea-times - chops, steak, kidney chips....... '
"she (the wife) prepares a big hot meal for the evening"

katsy
Local time: 18:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cooked tea
souper (léger)


Explanation:
It's a very English institution that has no exact FR equivalent, so you'll probably have to invent a term, depending on how it has to be used!

'tea' is usually what we eat at 5 o'c, with cake, sandwiches, etc. Sometimes, an mainly in the odlen days, we would use 'tea' to refer to the meal of the evning that would be 'souper' in FR — assuming that the main meal of the day 'dinner' had been taken at 'dinner time', i.e. noon; this is something of a class difference, where working class families would eat 'dinner' at midday and 'tea' in the evening, whereas middle- or upper-class families would eat 'luncheon' at midday and 'dinner' in the evening.

Now a 'cooked tea' would be something more substantial, say with eggs on toast, or some other kind of hot savoury 'snack'.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2007-03-07 11:38:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although it would indeed be the 'repas du soir', it is probably not a full meal, more like just one hot dish...

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:18
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 98
Grading comment
Thanks Tony, I was kind of hoping there was a 'standard' translation but your explanation and your translation helped me a great deal. Thanks a bunch :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  jean-jacques alexandre: Hi Tony, thanks for the lesson in social civilisation
51 mins
  -> Hi J-J! Oh, 'high tea' is SUCH a civilized affair!

agree  Melzie: the meal is likely to be quite early in French eyes I also found goûter dînatoire chaud as an option
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Melzie! Indeed yes. Goodness, I'd never have thought that one up!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
cooked tea
dîner


Explanation:
C'est le repas du soir, du moins en GB et sans plus de contexte...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2007-03-07 11:43:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Les classes dites "populaires" ne sont pas forcément illettrées : même chez moi, on n'utilisait pas "repas du soir" mais "dîner" - parce que c'est le mot décrivant le... "repas du soir".

Quant à "souper", il peut s'agir d'un repas pris tard le soir (à l'origine, en revenant du spectacle ou de l'opéra - ce qui n'est pas exactement très "populaire"...)

xxxPFB
Local time: 18:18
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Even though it would indeed be the 'repas du soir', 'dîner' would give quite the wrong impression of what it consists of. i don't go to the opera, so in my humble 'milieu ouvrier', I have my 'souper' earlier!
6 mins

neutral  katsy: don't disagree with the meaning, but 'dîner' is perhaps a bit too 'classy'?
13 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cooked tea
un 5 o'clock chaud


Explanation:
I just had a brainwave. This might be a little old hat but I do remeber people using 'le 5 o'clock' as a noun. Would they today? Now there's the rub...


Melzie
Local time: 18:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search