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first class registered letter

French translation: lettre recommandée (avec accusé de réception) au tarif normal

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16:39 Mar 19, 2007
English to French translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Law (general) / Contrat de fourniture de services informatiques
English term or phrase: first class registered letter
19.11.2 notice sent by post shall be deemed to have been given forty eight (48) hours after a first class registered letter is posted to the appropriate address;
PH Translations
Switzerland
Local time: 06:10
French translation:lettre recommandée (avec accusé de réception) au tarif normal
Explanation:
'first class' post in the UK sort of aims for next day delivery, and so equates to 'tarif normal' in France; '2nd class' is like 'tarif lent'

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Note added at 8 mins (2007-03-19 16:47:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The 'accusé de réception' bit: AFAIK, in the UK, ALL registered mail is automatically with Advice of Delivery, hence it isn't specified separately as it is in France; the old Recorded Delivery service used to be like that, but I think that's long discontinued...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-03-19 19:40:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

AT has of course raised an interesting point there: without the rest of the context, none of us has any way of knowing what the reader of this document is meant to do; if they merely need to understand what is meant to be happening in this procedure, it is probably more appropriate to make a 'cultural translation' into something equivalent that will be instantly understandable in their home country.

However, of course, if they actually have to comply with these intsructions (in the UK), then clearly it is more appropriate to translate literally — perhaps with an explanatory note.

Of course, if the poor person is reading the FR document in FR but still has to comply with the instructions, then there's a bit of a problem!

Asker will need to decide whether a supplementary explanation is advisable or not.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 06:10
Grading comment
Merci.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7lettre recommandée (avec accusé de réception) au tarif normal
Tony M
4 +1courrier recommandé au tarif prioritaire
Robin Levey
3 +2pli /lettre recommandé(e) de première classe
Francis MARC


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
pli /lettre recommandé(e) de première classe


Explanation:
WES - Additional Services... les frais d’expédition en courrier de première classe normal. ... Les livraisons express et sous pli recommandé sont les moyens les plus fiables. ...
www.wes.org/ca/fr/fees/additional.asp - 26k -
Postes Canada : 15 h - Poste ordinaire de première classe, lettres spéciales, courrier sous pli recommandé, colis. 2.2. Companies de messagerie : 15 h - à ...
www.uottawa.ca/services/immeub/fra/service_postal_contenu.h... - 50k

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 07:10
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 238

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marie-Josée Labonté: D'accord avec Francis.
0 min

neutral  Tony M: Yes, but only for Canada! We don't have 'first class' here in France, do we?
1 min
  -> personne sauf le demandeur sait qui est la cible qui lira le texte en français, l'alternative est de mettre une note expliquant les postes canadiennes ....

neutral  GILOU: jamais entendu parler en France....
6 mins

agree  AllegroTrans: It's not a matter of wheher you have 1st class in France surely - it's a matter of translation and we DO have 1st class in GB and that's what needs to be conveyed - without any compromise
1 hr

neutral  chaplin: cela n'est pas le sens! Votre traduction donne une opinion sur la qualité et non la vitesse du courrier
6 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
courrier recommandé au tarif prioritaire


Explanation:
This would be a suitable translation if the translation is for Belgium, which has a two-tier system similar to that in the UK.

Belgium's (supposedly) 'next day' service is called 'prioritaire'.

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 01:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GILOU
11 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
lettre recommandée (avec accusé de réception) au tarif normal


Explanation:
'first class' post in the UK sort of aims for next day delivery, and so equates to 'tarif normal' in France; '2nd class' is like 'tarif lent'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2007-03-19 16:47:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The 'accusé de réception' bit: AFAIK, in the UK, ALL registered mail is automatically with Advice of Delivery, hence it isn't specified separately as it is in France; the old Recorded Delivery service used to be like that, but I think that's long discontinued...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-03-19 19:40:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

AT has of course raised an interesting point there: without the rest of the context, none of us has any way of knowing what the reader of this document is meant to do; if they merely need to understand what is meant to be happening in this procedure, it is probably more appropriate to make a 'cultural translation' into something equivalent that will be instantly understandable in their home country.

However, of course, if they actually have to comply with these intsructions (in the UK), then clearly it is more appropriate to translate literally — perhaps with an explanatory note.

Of course, if the poor person is reading the FR document in FR but still has to comply with the instructions, then there's a bit of a problem!

Asker will need to decide whether a supplementary explanation is advisable or not.

Tony M
France
Local time: 06:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110
Grading comment
Merci.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BusterK
30 mins
  -> Thanks, Buster!

agree  katsy
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Katsy!

agree  xxxcmwilliams: and no, Recorded Delivery hasn't been discontinued in the UK. In fact, the post office no longer uses the term 'registered'.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, CMW! Well, I guess that's reassuring... thanks for the info!

agree  Melzie: I wouldn't bother with the tarif normal even
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Melzie! I agree, except they are obviosuly being quite specific about the deadline, which seems fairly tight

agree  Emma Rogers: I agree with Melzie re: "tarif normal"
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Emma! Please also see my comment in reply to Melzie...

agree  chaplin
6 hrs
  -> Merci, Ségolène !

agree  nads022: C'est en tout cas l'expression qui va le mieux à la poste suisse!
1 day5 hrs
  -> Merci, Nads !
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Changes made by editors
Mar 19, 2007 - Changes made by writeaway:
FieldLaw/Patents » Bus/Financial


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