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10:50 Nov 12, 2000
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: risingly
I need to find the adverbs corresponding to the following verbs: rise, improve, craft in english (or at least if the -LY form is the correct one). If this is not the right site for my question, I would be grateful if you could indicate a more appropriate one. Thank You.
Sorina Casian-Botez

Summary of answers provided
na(risingly)Louise Atfield
narisingly, improvingly, craftilyKika
namontant; qui monte
Yolanda Broad



8 hrs
montant; qui monte

Hello Sorina,

I think you've come to the right place, but don't think you've asked the right question. That is to say, adverbs are not derived from verbs, but, rather, are **added** semantic and grammatical information to make the meaning of the verb clearer, or to add meaning to an adjective. Usually, they are formed by adding -ly to an *adjective*. A little bit of explanation of what adverbs and adjectives *do* in a sentence.

To improve has a *corresponding* adjective form: "improving." And one can form an adverb from the adjective: "improvingly". Here is an example I just fished off the Web (in a Google search); note that the adverb is modifying other adjectives, not a verb!

Managed Care - 8/16/96 Morning Session - Part 2
... other MBHOs in eastern and central Missouri to develop, we hope, an improvingly responsive and comprehensive service delivery system to meet the needs of the ...

1. They add more meaning, as you can tell by looking at the words "adverb" and "adjective". As a matter of fact, the role of an adverb is contained in its very name: it adds meaning to verbs. [Adjective is a little less obvious: ad+jective (from the Latin verb meaning: to throw, lay, used here to meaning, thrown or attached to): something added or attached]

2. They are descriptive of an action (=verb) or someone/something (=noun).

3. There are many more adjectives than adverbs; and more adverbs are used to add descriptive meaning to other adjectives, than to do the same for verbs.

This said, there is an *adjective* "rising". When "rising, " exceptionally, is used to add meaning to another adjective, it is, technically, an adverb; however, it doesn't change form (does not add -ly), and really is forming a "compound" adjective. A couple of examples from the Shorter OED: rising five (= a child approaching the age of five); rising damp (= moisture absorbed from the ground into a wall). Rising damp, of course, is really a noun phrase...

    Shorter Oxford English Dictionary; Temrium
    Google search machine
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 19:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 720
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16 hrs
risingly, improvingly, craftily

RISE: risingly (de plus en plus, toujours plus, toujours davantage)

IMPROVE: improvingly (de mieux en mieux)

CRAFT: (art; adresse, habileté) as far as I know, it is a noun, not a verb, and there is no corresponding adverb, but there is the adjective

CRAFTY: craftily (adroitment, habilement).


Local time: 01:09
PRO pts in pair: 44
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1 day28 mins

Hi Sorina,

I understand that you want to know how to build an adverb in English from other English words. I don't think that this is quite the right site for this kind of question, since it doesn't involve a translation from English to French. This being said, I am happy that Yolanda answered your question so well (And Yolanda, I must say I am most surprised you did, since you once told someone else that this was not a site for grammar questions ;-) )

I have another site to suggest which might be a great help to you in the future. It is an English grammar clinic, where keen amateurs as well as professionals answer grammar questions on the Net. Here is the address:

I have asked questions from them in the past (although it has been a while) and found it very good at the time. I hope you will find it as useful as I have.


Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 577
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