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bumps a daisy / billy-o

French translation: leave "bumps a daisy" in quotes (with explanation in parentheses)

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19:13 Jul 25, 2005
English to French translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: bumps a daisy / billy-o
Dans un texte littéraire que je cherche à traduire en français, je suis tombée sur cette phrase:
"He looked, they thought, about as bumps-a-daisy as billy-o."
J'ai compris le sens mais je cherche désespérément des expressions françaises correspondantes... A vous de jouer!! Merci
Marinette
French translation:leave "bumps a daisy" in quotes (with explanation in parentheses)
Explanation:
bumps-a-daisy is the name of a dance but is also what some people say when they hit a bump in the road or take a tumble

buses. In Teletubbyland, the Tubbies dance a bumps-a-daisy dance. ... buses. In Teletubbyland, the Tubbies dance a bumps-a-daisy dance. ...
https://www.kcts.org/seriesdetail. asp?N1=TTUB&Page=11&TimeFrame=Upcoming

BBC - Parents' Music Room - Musical Games With Baby - [ Traduire cette page ]
Bumps-a-Daisy. This is an activity that you could do with your child from about six months, when they have a bit more strength to support themselves. ...
www.bbc.co.uk/music/parents/yourchild/ prebirth_18mnths/musical_games.shtml
--------------------
Billy-o
Nobody knows where the idiom really comes from, though the first part might be from Billy, a pet form of William, which has been a common generic term for a man in parts of Scotland and the north of England for centuries. The first recorded use is in the phrase “Shure it’ll rain like billy-oh!”, from The Record of 1885, in which the spelling of sure hints at an Irish origin.
It’s rather more probable that it’s a euphemistic reformulation of the phrase like the devil, which dates back to Shakespearean times. There are expressions, older than billy-o, in which Billy is a euphemism for the devil: billy-be-damned and giving somebody all billy hell, so it would seem that there’s probably a devilish connection in there somewhere.
http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-bil1.htm
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 02:10
Grading comment
Thank you sooooo much!!! I believe I will use your explanation to find a translation, as I really can't leave it in English...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3leave "bumps a daisy" in quotes (with explanation in parentheses)RHELLER


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
leave "bumps a daisy" in quotes (with explanation in parentheses)


Explanation:
bumps-a-daisy is the name of a dance but is also what some people say when they hit a bump in the road or take a tumble

buses. In Teletubbyland, the Tubbies dance a bumps-a-daisy dance. ... buses. In Teletubbyland, the Tubbies dance a bumps-a-daisy dance. ...
https://www.kcts.org/seriesdetail. asp?N1=TTUB&Page=11&TimeFrame=Upcoming

BBC - Parents' Music Room - Musical Games With Baby - [ Traduire cette page ]
Bumps-a-Daisy. This is an activity that you could do with your child from about six months, when they have a bit more strength to support themselves. ...
www.bbc.co.uk/music/parents/yourchild/ prebirth_18mnths/musical_games.shtml
--------------------
Billy-o
Nobody knows where the idiom really comes from, though the first part might be from Billy, a pet form of William, which has been a common generic term for a man in parts of Scotland and the north of England for centuries. The first recorded use is in the phrase “Shure it’ll rain like billy-oh!”, from The Record of 1885, in which the spelling of sure hints at an Irish origin.
It’s rather more probable that it’s a euphemistic reformulation of the phrase like the devil, which dates back to Shakespearean times. There are expressions, older than billy-o, in which Billy is a euphemism for the devil: billy-be-damned and giving somebody all billy hell, so it would seem that there’s probably a devilish connection in there somewhere.
http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-bil1.htm

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 02:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thank you sooooo much!!! I believe I will use your explanation to find a translation, as I really can't leave it in English...
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