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Fruit of the Vine

French translation: le fruit de la vigne

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00:19 Jul 13, 2008
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
English term or phrase: Fruit of the Vine
Need French translation to use as a machine embroidered monogram
Dana
French translation:le fruit de la vigne
Explanation:
OK, just to start the ball rolling for you, there is the word-for-word literal translation such as you could easily get from any dictionary.

But it's unlikely to be ideal for what you need, if you could only explain a bit more of the purpose here?

For a start, remember that 'fruit' in EN may be singular or a (collective) plural; given that in FR it would probably more often be found used in conjunction with a definite article, you are sort of obliged to make the decision as to whether it refers to the singular, or collective plural. I've suggested the singular as more likely, but it is conceivable that you might need it in the plural, even though that doesn't at first sight seem appropriate in EN.

But to what extent is 'fruit' being used figuratively or literally here? That might also affect the best choice of term.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-07-13 08:26:21 GMT)
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Right, in that case, I think the phrase I have suggested could work OK; 'le vin' is also 'le fruit de la vigne', and so the play-on-words works well enough, IMHO.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:31
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5le fruit de la vigne
Tony M
3 +4"Raisins d'être"
Robin Levey


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
fruit of the vine
"Raisins d'être"


Explanation:
I apologise at once if this sounds like another French lesson, but I'm taking the liberty of assuming you don't speak French ...

I'm assuming also that your 'fruit of the vine' is a parody of 'Fruit of the L..m', seen embroidered on expensive sweat-shirts.

If you want something a little thought-provoking, why not a play on words?

'grapes', in French, is 'raisins'. It is pronounced 'rayzan'.

The French 'raison' means reason. And it it pronounced 'rayzon'.

'raison d'être' means, literally, 'the reason for being' or 'the reason for life'. There are some people I know who would equate 'raisins' (preferably pressed, fermented and aged) with 'raison d'être' (the good things in life).

Of course, if you want something very literal, you'd do better to take Tony's advice ...

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I like raison d'etre' so much better. It also fits the embroidery design as well. Thank you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Juan Jacob: Ooooh ! Très bien !
14 mins

agree  Tony M: Nice one, M/M! And ideal, now we know Asker's full context / But Asker, please note it should be 'raisIn d'être', for the pun to work!
6 hrs

agree  Alain Berton
6 hrs

agree  Catherine CHAUVIN: Le jeu de mots est extra.
12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
fruit of the vine
le fruit de la vigne


Explanation:
OK, just to start the ball rolling for you, there is the word-for-word literal translation such as you could easily get from any dictionary.

But it's unlikely to be ideal for what you need, if you could only explain a bit more of the purpose here?

For a start, remember that 'fruit' in EN may be singular or a (collective) plural; given that in FR it would probably more often be found used in conjunction with a definite article, you are sort of obliged to make the decision as to whether it refers to the singular, or collective plural. I've suggested the singular as more likely, but it is conceivable that you might need it in the plural, even though that doesn't at first sight seem appropriate in EN.

But to what extent is 'fruit' being used figuratively or literally here? That might also affect the best choice of term.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2008-07-13 08:26:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Right, in that case, I think the phrase I have suggested could work OK; 'le vin' is also 'le fruit de la vigne', and so the play-on-words works well enough, IMHO.

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Juan Jacob: With no further context... mais quelle machine ?
2 mins
  -> Merci, Juan !

agree  bohy: Quelle superbe leçon d'anglais !
3 mins
  -> Merci, Bohy ! Vous pensez... ? Merci, alors !

agree  Arnold007: Et même sans le "Le" !
25 mins
  -> Merci, Arnold !

agree  Ilinca Florea
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Ilinca!

agree  Catherine CHAUVIN: l'explication est géniale.
12 hrs
  -> Merci beaucoup, Catherine !
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