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closed captioning

Georgian translation: სუბტიტრები

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:closed captioning
Georgian translation:სუბტიტრები
Entered by: Salome Tkhelia
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12:38 Mar 14, 2008
English to Georgian translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Telecom(munications) / სატელევიზიო ტერმინი
English term or phrase: closed captioning
Digital TV provides interactive capabilities and data services such as significantly enhanced closed captioning.
Salome Tkhelia
Georgia
Local time: 01:34
სუბტიტრები
Explanation:
(CC) (commonly known as subtitles, and also called subtitles for the hearing impaired) allows people who ...

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Note added at 31 mins (2008-03-14 13:10:31 GMT)
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Closed captioning (CC) (commonly known as subtitles, and also called subtitles for the hearing impaired) allows people who are deaf or hard of hearing, learning a new language, beginning to read, in a noisy environment, or otherwise prefer to read a transcript or dialog of the audio portion of a video, film, or other presentation. As the video plays, text captions are displayed that transcribe (although not always verbatim) speech and often other relevant sounds.

The term "closed" in closed captioning means that not all viewers see the captions— only those who decode or activate them, which allows people to understand the audio portion and enjoy a televised program while hiding it from those who do not. This distinguishes from "open captions," where all viewers see the captions, calling permanently visible captions in a video, film, or other medium "open", "burned-in", or "hardcoded" captions.

Most of the world does not distinguish captions from subtitles. In the United States and Canada, these terms do have different meanings, however: "subtitles" assume the viewer can hear but cannot understand the language, so they only translate dialogue and some on-screen text. "Captions" aim to describe all significant audio content and "non-speech information," such as the identity of speakers and their manner of speaking, along with music or sound effects using words or symbols.

The United Kingdom, Ireland, and most other countries do not distinguish between subtitles and closed captions, and use "subtitles" as the general term — the equivalent of "captioning" is usually referred to as "Subtitles for the hard of hearing".

In the United States, the National Captioning Institute noted that 'English-as-a-second-language' (ESL) learners were the largest group buying decoders in the late 1980s and early 1990s before built-in decoders became a standard feature of U.S. television sets. This suggested that the largest audience of closed captioning was people whose native language was not English. In the United Kingdom, of 7.5 million people using TV subtitles (closed captioning), 6 million have a hearing disability[citation needed].
Selected response from:

Levan Namoradze
Georgia
Local time: 01:34
Grading comment
10X :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4სუბტიტრები
Levan Namoradze


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
სუბტიტრები


Explanation:
(CC) (commonly known as subtitles, and also called subtitles for the hearing impaired) allows people who ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 31 mins (2008-03-14 13:10:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Closed captioning (CC) (commonly known as subtitles, and also called subtitles for the hearing impaired) allows people who are deaf or hard of hearing, learning a new language, beginning to read, in a noisy environment, or otherwise prefer to read a transcript or dialog of the audio portion of a video, film, or other presentation. As the video plays, text captions are displayed that transcribe (although not always verbatim) speech and often other relevant sounds.

The term "closed" in closed captioning means that not all viewers see the captions— only those who decode or activate them, which allows people to understand the audio portion and enjoy a televised program while hiding it from those who do not. This distinguishes from "open captions," where all viewers see the captions, calling permanently visible captions in a video, film, or other medium "open", "burned-in", or "hardcoded" captions.

Most of the world does not distinguish captions from subtitles. In the United States and Canada, these terms do have different meanings, however: "subtitles" assume the viewer can hear but cannot understand the language, so they only translate dialogue and some on-screen text. "Captions" aim to describe all significant audio content and "non-speech information," such as the identity of speakers and their manner of speaking, along with music or sound effects using words or symbols.

The United Kingdom, Ireland, and most other countries do not distinguish between subtitles and closed captions, and use "subtitles" as the general term — the equivalent of "captioning" is usually referred to as "Subtitles for the hard of hearing".

In the United States, the National Captioning Institute noted that 'English-as-a-second-language' (ESL) learners were the largest group buying decoders in the late 1980s and early 1990s before built-in decoders became a standard feature of U.S. television sets. This suggested that the largest audience of closed captioning was people whose native language was not English. In the United Kingdom, of 7.5 million people using TV subtitles (closed captioning), 6 million have a hearing disability[citation needed].


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closed_captioning
Levan Namoradze
Georgia
Local time: 01:34
Native speaker of: Native in GeorgianGeorgian
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
10X :)
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Changes made by editors
Mar 17, 2008 - Changes made by Salome Tkhelia:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/645142">Salome Tkhelia's</a> old entry - "closed captioning" » "სუბტიტრები"


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