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cum laude ...

German translation: cum laude

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18:55 May 20, 2002
English to German translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Education / Pedagogy / Personnel/Management
English term or phrase: cum laude ...
I have to translate profiles of a bunch of high-flyers. Can you give me the German equivalents for:
- cum laude
- magna cum laude
- summa cum laude
- with distinction
- with high distinction
- with highest distinction
- with honors
- with first-year honors
- with second-year honors

Or would it be better to keep them in English/Latin?
Friedrich Reinold
United States
Local time: 11:02
German translation:cum laude
Explanation:
Leave the Latin terms as they are.
Selected response from:

ntext
United States
Local time: 13:02
Grading comment
Thanks.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +14cum laudentext
5 +6leave as is
danilingua


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
cum laude


Explanation:
Leave the Latin terms as they are.

ntext
United States
Local time: 13:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 53
Grading comment
Thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Slattery: Latin terms are the same in German academic titles. i would also leave the English ones, as there is no direct equivalent, maybe put a translation in brackets).
10 mins

agree  Geneviève von Levetzow
11 mins

agree  Manfred Mondt: Leave it,most English speaking people don't know what it means either!
13 mins

agree  Pee Eff
1 hr

agree  jerrie
2 hrs

agree  Gabriele Kaser, Mag. phil.
2 hrs

agree  Helga Humlova
3 hrs

agree  Kathleen: Definitely leave the Latin terms alone; they are also used with German diplomas, and the English honors should also be left alone as well! Put a German translation in Italics and grackets.
10 hrs

agree  Petra Winter
10 hrs

agree  Steffen Walter: with Kathleen
13 hrs

agree  Ursula Peter-Czichi
13 hrs

agree  Ang
13 hrs

agree  Tanja Wohlgemuth
13 hrs

agree  xxxbrute
16 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
leave as is


Explanation:
Hi, terms of this kind are usually left as they are (proper names, for example)

Same goes for Latin. Is not translated. And besides, the people dealing with that kind of information do know those terms. And it really is not habitual to have a German expression for it. It would look rather odd.



Check a 'Webster's' if you want.

danilingua
Germany
Local time: 20:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxDr.G.MD: leave as is
23 mins

agree  Geneviève von Levetzow
1 hr

agree  Gabriele Kaser, Mag. phil.
2 hrs

agree  Kathleen
10 hrs

agree  Ang
13 hrs

agree  xxxbrute
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Jan 28, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Field (specific)Human Resources » Education / Pedagogy
Apr 18, 2005 - Changes made by ntext:
Field (specific)(none) » Human Resources


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