KudoZ home » English to German » Linguistics

Ultra- (prefix)

German translation: ultra-

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
10:28 Aug 4, 2006
English to German translations [PRO]
Linguistics
English term or phrase: Ultra- (prefix)
Hi,

English dictionaries provide the following definition of the prefix "ultra":
1. Beyond; on the other side of; e.g. ultraviolet.
2. Beyond the range, scope, or limit of; e.g. ultrasonic.
[Latin ultrā-, from ultrā, beyond.]

I just need to know whether it means exactly the same in German, or über, hoch, hyper... would be more accurate translations. (I am looking for the German translation of a fancy word for a brand; something like ultraperception, ultracognition, ultralearning...)

Many thanks!
Alberto
albertop9
Local time: 05:40
German translation:ultra-
Explanation:
Duden has the following to say to ultra:

ultra- [lat. ultra = über - hinaus] (verstärkend): drückt in Bildungen mit Adjektiven eine Verstärkung aus/in hohem Maße, extrem, äußerst: ultrakonservativ, ultramodern, ultraradikal

There is no general rule when in German you can use "ultra" and when it's better to use "über" (never "hoch", maybe "hyper" as this is a quite fashionable word). In the context of a fancy word for a brand, I would tend to use "über" or "hyper" but not ultra.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 Min. (2006-08-04 11:05:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, "über" is the equivalent to "ultra", but it really depends on the word (see Nicole's example). I think, you are quite safe to use "über" with nouns while adjectives work better with "ultra". But, as already mentioned, there is no rule that fits all.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 Stunde (2006-08-04 12:15:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hmm, that's a tough one, good thing you give us the exact word, as neither "Überverführung" nor "Ultraverführung" really works. Definitely not "Überverführung", that sounds too much like "Überführung" (transferral) and would not be understood. It would probably be the best to split the word up and use "ultimative Verführung" (if it's a seduction that can't be topped) or "übermäßige Verführung" (which would be more a negative way to express it, meaning it's too much). Would be easier if we would have some context and the original English word. And no worries, your secret is safe with us ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 Stunde (2006-08-04 12:16:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, by the way, no hyphens in words starting with "ultra" or "über".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 Stunden (2006-08-04 21:17:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Exactly, "ultimative" means "ultimate". It doesn't quite mean "beyond" but more that is the absolute best you can get, there's nothing better.
Selected response from:

Ingo Dierkschnieder
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:40
Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +3ultra-
Ingo Dierkschnieder


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
ultra- (prefix)
ultra-


Explanation:
Duden has the following to say to ultra:

ultra- [lat. ultra = über - hinaus] (verstärkend): drückt in Bildungen mit Adjektiven eine Verstärkung aus/in hohem Maße, extrem, äußerst: ultrakonservativ, ultramodern, ultraradikal

There is no general rule when in German you can use "ultra" and when it's better to use "über" (never "hoch", maybe "hyper" as this is a quite fashionable word). In the context of a fancy word for a brand, I would tend to use "über" or "hyper" but not ultra.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 Min. (2006-08-04 11:05:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, "über" is the equivalent to "ultra", but it really depends on the word (see Nicole's example). I think, you are quite safe to use "über" with nouns while adjectives work better with "ultra". But, as already mentioned, there is no rule that fits all.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 Stunde (2006-08-04 12:15:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hmm, that's a tough one, good thing you give us the exact word, as neither "Überverführung" nor "Ultraverführung" really works. Definitely not "Überverführung", that sounds too much like "Überführung" (transferral) and would not be understood. It would probably be the best to split the word up and use "ultimative Verführung" (if it's a seduction that can't be topped) or "übermäßige Verführung" (which would be more a negative way to express it, meaning it's too much). Would be easier if we would have some context and the original English word. And no worries, your secret is safe with us ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 Stunde (2006-08-04 12:16:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, by the way, no hyphens in words starting with "ultra" or "über".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 Stunden (2006-08-04 21:17:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Exactly, "ultimative" means "ultimate". It doesn't quite mean "beyond" but more that is the absolute best you can get, there's nothing better.

Ingo Dierkschnieder
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 11
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a lot for your explanation, Ingo! So... As a prefix, über is equivalent to ultra in English - meaning the above - is that right? ...In such case I'll go for über. Thanks again!

Asker: Okay, I'll tell you the exact word I'm considering... (Sorry I need to be so sure! It's because it's for some kind of brand and some money will be spent on it... - So please keep my secret! ;-)) The word would be either "Überverführung" or "Ultraverführung." (Should it be über- or ultra-verführung, with a hyphen??) What's your final verdict, Ingo, Nicole?? And thanks very very much for your help! - Alberto :-)

Asker: Sure, Ingo! The original English word is precisely "Ultraseduction"! :-) It may not make real sense, but - well, it's a fancy name for this brand! And both senses of "ultra-" (extreme / beyond) are fully relevant to the idea of this product. That's why seek its equivalent prefix in German. However, for the sake of the word's appeal, we'll consider carefully your advice!

Asker: ("That's why seek" should read "That's why we seek" - Sorry!)

Asker: ULTIMATIVE. ...Right... And what does it mean exactly? - Sorry I know nothing of German! - Is it equal to "ultimate" in English? Does it still have the "beyond" sense I was seeking? Thanks a lot!

Asker: Got it. Thanks for your patience, Ingo. I owe you one!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nicole Schnell: I agree with "ultra". "Überweiße Wäsche" oder "Hyperweiße Zahncreme" wäre jedoch bizarr.//Ja, ob Latein, Griechisch oder Deutsch - was eben am Besten (und am exotischsten!) klingt. In den US wird "Über" immer mehr zum Modewort.//Au weiah. :-))
18 mins
  -> Es kommt wirklich auf das jeweilige Wort an. In deinem Beispiel wäre ultraweiß wohl gebräuchlicher, obwohl es mich nicht wundern würde, wenn überweiß oder hyperweiß ebenfalls verwendet werden. // Nicht nur in den USA, ist hier in GB auch der Fall.

agree  BirgitBerlin: ...and if and when you have use a noun in connection with a hyphen (avoid where you can!) then the noun still needs to be with a capital! But with "Verführung" a prefix doesn't work. I agree with Ingos proposal to split the words and write "ultimative V."
2 hrs

agree  xxxFrancis Lee: Als ich den "Verführung"-Zusammenhang sah war mein erster Gedanke ebenfalls "ultimative V"
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search