KudoZ home » English to German » Other

Re: Google Searches

German translation: Translation not requested

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Google Searches
German translation:Translation not requested
Entered by: Dan McCrosky
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:28 Mar 9, 2002
English to German translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: Re: Google Searches
This is not a translation question, but a question regarding Google searches. I've noticed quite a few translators on ProZ.com refer to Google hits. If I have a word or term I don't have a clue how to translate, I might search for it on Google and get a lot of hits, but I still won't have a translation. How do I get from one to the other? Maybe you can give me a tip.

Thanks a lot.
Olav Rixen
Canada
Local time: 19:30
More of the same sort of info
Explanation:
Most of the times the KudoZ references you have seen were using Google to check the validity and popularity of a term THE TRANSLATOR ALREADY SUSPECTED WAS RIGHT. The Google or AltaVista searches can also be very useful in comparing the popularity of several target language possibilities.

You can also start from nothing though. Other answers have already been submitted with this general idea, but here it is again. There are two tricks to this, however they take time and don't always work:

1. Search for your English term with the domains .de and language German. If you are lucky, a bilingual glossary or bilingual site (which uses both the German and the English terms) will come up in the hit results.

2. If you don't find anything good with trick one, try your term again without the .de domain and without any specific language. Then do page searches (Strg+F) of each page of the URLs that turn up. Sometimes just scrolling down is faster. If any of the URLs contain the word "english" or "englisch" or any abbreviations like "en", "uk", or "eng", go to the site and if it looks like it has potential, change the term in the URL to "deutsch" or "german" or the abbreviation to "de" or "ger" and then try to go to the new URL. You will get many "Die Seite kann nicht angezeigt werden." messages, but sometimes you can find a goldmine site that translates the entire English site, including your term, into German.

HTH

Dan
Selected response from:

Dan McCrosky
Local time: 04:30
Grading comment
Thanks so much, Dan! Also many thanks to everyone who gave an answer. I wish I could give all of you points. Olav
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5Careful! Sleuthing Can Be Addictive
Ursula Peter-Czichi
5synonyms
Alexander Schleber
4mulitlingual websitesbvogt
4one of the posibilities is
Elisabeth Ghysels
4try narrowing down the searchwrtransco
1More of the same sort of infoDan McCrosky


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
try narrowing down the search


Explanation:
by providing other pertinent word.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-09 12:35:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I should add - if you don\'t know, what the term means, try to figure it out from similar context as your text. Then search in the other langue the same way.

wrtransco
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 187
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
one of the posibilities is


Explanation:
to search for the term in the foreign language, while limiting Google to searches in your own language, let's say German. But in reality, what usually happens is that one has a well founded idea on how to translate something, and than uses Google only to control, whether this terminology one is planning to use really is used regularly enough (if you only find three hits, then there might be something rotten in the State of Denmark). And be careful not to trust all websites; try to trust only websites which originate from your target country.
Freundliche Grüsse,

Nikolaus

Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 04:30
PRO pts in pair: 526
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
mulitlingual websites


Explanation:
Google Searches may help you to come across multilingual websites where you may be able to finde a translation - which of course, you cannot always accept blindly. You may also find in the context other terms you can enter as search criteria and eventually narrow down your search.
Elisabeth

bvogt
Canada
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 36
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
More of the same sort of info


Explanation:
Most of the times the KudoZ references you have seen were using Google to check the validity and popularity of a term THE TRANSLATOR ALREADY SUSPECTED WAS RIGHT. The Google or AltaVista searches can also be very useful in comparing the popularity of several target language possibilities.

You can also start from nothing though. Other answers have already been submitted with this general idea, but here it is again. There are two tricks to this, however they take time and don't always work:

1. Search for your English term with the domains .de and language German. If you are lucky, a bilingual glossary or bilingual site (which uses both the German and the English terms) will come up in the hit results.

2. If you don't find anything good with trick one, try your term again without the .de domain and without any specific language. Then do page searches (Strg+F) of each page of the URLs that turn up. Sometimes just scrolling down is faster. If any of the URLs contain the word "english" or "englisch" or any abbreviations like "en", "uk", or "eng", go to the site and if it looks like it has potential, change the term in the URL to "deutsch" or "german" or the abbreviation to "de" or "ger" and then try to go to the new URL. You will get many "Die Seite kann nicht angezeigt werden." messages, but sometimes you can find a goldmine site that translates the entire English site, including your term, into German.

HTH

Dan


Dan McCrosky
Local time: 04:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 390
Grading comment
Thanks so much, Dan! Also many thanks to everyone who gave an answer. I wish I could give all of you points. Olav
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
synonyms


Explanation:
While Google does (every once in a while) offer a translation of the page in question, most translations are usually abominally bad. So, as Dan suggests, finding a multilingual site can be a blessing. Some sites with competing product ranges (particularly in the technical fields) will have multilingual sites or offer a glossary of terms.

But often, I look for synonyms in the hits that Google delivers. Often these can be found on the firsat short extract of the site, sometimes in the site, if the material covered relates to your context. These sysnonyms sometimes then deliver the translation by way of your normal sources.

Synonyms are also very helpful in dictionaries. Take a root of the term you want, then go from lets say Ernst to the target language, and take the synonyms there to go back to your source language. Often a luminous idea will suddenly arise to help you on your way. The synonyms both in the source and target language can, of course, also again be used for Google or other search engines. A little practice with this technique will usually speed up what sounds like a laborious process.

HTH

Alexander Schleber
Belgium
Local time: 04:30
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1466
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Careful! Sleuthing Can Be Addictive


Explanation:
The Stone of Wisdom:
There is little to add after all helpful suggestion, but this one: By all means use ADVANCED SEARCH. It saves a lot of time.
Here is an example:
Looking for the term 'The Stone of Wisdom' will bring up a huge number of hits. Excluding 'Harry Potter' in an advanced search will make the data base manageable.
However, not too much should be excluded. In this example, if you excluded 'opera' from the search, you would miss a nice learning experience and the most common translation: The Philosopher's Stone.

'Der Stein der Weisen' is the only opera composed by a committee.
See: Googling can become addictive!

Ursula Peter-Czichi
United States
Local time: 22:30
PRO pts in pair: 78
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search