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a pint of beer please

German translation: ein Bier, bitte

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21:57 Mar 24, 2002
English to German translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: a pint of beer please
asking for beer in a pub
geordie
German translation:ein Bier, bitte
Explanation:
if you really want a pint, the closest you'll get to it in Germany would be to ask "eine Halbe, bitte" oder "ein grosses Bier" (0.5 l, the small one would be 0.3 l)

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Note added at 2002-03-24 22:02:42 (GMT)
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\"Ein Bier, bitte\" is the most common used phrase and the most commonly sold amount is the half-liter anyway. Depending on the pub it should come in a glass, even if it isn\'t draught beer.

You could of course ask for \"ein Bier vom Fass\", but do you do if you are in a place which doesn\'t do draft? The phrase \"ein Bier, bitte\" works anywhere.

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Note added at 2002-03-24 22:04:29 (GMT)
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sorry, the last sentence is meant to contain \"what\" between but ...and ...do
Selected response from:

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 11:55
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3ein Bier, bitteKlaus Dorn


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
ein Bier, bitte


Explanation:
if you really want a pint, the closest you'll get to it in Germany would be to ask "eine Halbe, bitte" oder "ein grosses Bier" (0.5 l, the small one would be 0.3 l)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-24 22:02:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Ein Bier, bitte\" is the most common used phrase and the most commonly sold amount is the half-liter anyway. Depending on the pub it should come in a glass, even if it isn\'t draught beer.

You could of course ask for \"ein Bier vom Fass\", but do you do if you are in a place which doesn\'t do draft? The phrase \"ein Bier, bitte\" works anywhere.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-24 22:04:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, the last sentence is meant to contain \"what\" between but ...and ...do

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 11:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 743

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Geneviève von Levetzow
1 min
  -> thanks and Prost!

agree  Kim Metzger: Please enlighten me. Why EINE HALBE? I normally ask for ein Halbes.
10 mins
  -> I see...that's the great northern-southern divide...north "halbes", south "halbe"

agree  Elvira Stoianov
52 mins
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