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hot body

German translation: (explanation)

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23:34 Jan 22, 2004
English to German translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / Bildgebungs-Optionen
English term or phrase: hot body
Adjust the mixing ratio, gray scale, hot body and window values to suit your needs.
Cornelia Mayer
France
Local time: 04:12
German translation:(explanation)
Explanation:
Sorry, I have no idea about the German term (hence my confidence level), but here are some explanations:

'Farbtemperatur' in Harry's second link is not relevant to the question. It - as well as his answer - refers to the white point of a computer monitor. Indeed, it is measured in °K and is related to the hot body temperature concept, but in monitors it only relates to how 'cold' or 'warm' the default white colour of the monitor is. Normally it can be set to several (3 to 5) values between 5000 (warm white) and 9300 (cool white) °K only.

The hot body (or thermal) colour scale, as very well explained in Harry's first link, is a colour range containing only warm colours (yellow, orange, red) and black/white. It can be used for pseudo-colour images that the human eye perceives as natural-looking (like grayscale or monotone/duotone ones), even though they do not represent actual colours.

Note that this is different from the colour range used by the pyrometric temperature measurement method: the hot body colour scale DOES NOT CONTAIN BLUE. Therefore, it is different from 'Farbtemperatur'.

The lack of blue altogether makes it possible to use 16-bit colour (presumably 8 bits for a grayscale channel, plus another 8 bits for the chroma, or colour component channel) and still preserve smooth colour transitions (8-bit means each channel can contain 256 shades - same number of shades per channel as in full-colour modes such as RGB, LAB, CMYK etc.).

I guess in your case, Tikimayer, one can adjust:
- the shades/highlights level (which is the grayscale component);
- the chroma level (which is the 'hot body' component) - i.e. how pale or intensive the colour in the image is; and
- the blending of grayscale vs. chroma channels (this might be meant by 'mixing ratio').

Frankly, I have no guess about 'window values'... maybe it refers to the image dimensions/size?

In addition, CT means Continuous Tone (image); don't know about MR, though.

HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs 33 mins (2004-01-23 23:07:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops... turns out this is medical equipment. You should have said so, Tikimayer :)

CT = computer tomograph; MR = magnetic resonance

I think you can just replace \'hot body\' with \'colour\'. The thermal colour scale is presumably the default (and maybe the only) one, so for an MR image it is *the colour*.
Selected response from:

invguy
Bulgaria
Local time: 05:12
Grading comment
Thank you very much, the explanation was very useful. I would have liked to award points to both of you. Harry's link helped me a lot. But I finally decided to translate by "Farbe" and give an explanation in one instance. Sorry, I didn't make it clearer that this relatetd to radiation oncology and imaging options.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1(explanation)
invguy
3Farbtemperatur
Harry Bornemann


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(explanation)


Explanation:
Sorry, I have no idea about the German term (hence my confidence level), but here are some explanations:

'Farbtemperatur' in Harry's second link is not relevant to the question. It - as well as his answer - refers to the white point of a computer monitor. Indeed, it is measured in °K and is related to the hot body temperature concept, but in monitors it only relates to how 'cold' or 'warm' the default white colour of the monitor is. Normally it can be set to several (3 to 5) values between 5000 (warm white) and 9300 (cool white) °K only.

The hot body (or thermal) colour scale, as very well explained in Harry's first link, is a colour range containing only warm colours (yellow, orange, red) and black/white. It can be used for pseudo-colour images that the human eye perceives as natural-looking (like grayscale or monotone/duotone ones), even though they do not represent actual colours.

Note that this is different from the colour range used by the pyrometric temperature measurement method: the hot body colour scale DOES NOT CONTAIN BLUE. Therefore, it is different from 'Farbtemperatur'.

The lack of blue altogether makes it possible to use 16-bit colour (presumably 8 bits for a grayscale channel, plus another 8 bits for the chroma, or colour component channel) and still preserve smooth colour transitions (8-bit means each channel can contain 256 shades - same number of shades per channel as in full-colour modes such as RGB, LAB, CMYK etc.).

I guess in your case, Tikimayer, one can adjust:
- the shades/highlights level (which is the grayscale component);
- the chroma level (which is the 'hot body' component) - i.e. how pale or intensive the colour in the image is; and
- the blending of grayscale vs. chroma channels (this might be meant by 'mixing ratio').

Frankly, I have no guess about 'window values'... maybe it refers to the image dimensions/size?

In addition, CT means Continuous Tone (image); don't know about MR, though.

HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 23 hrs 33 mins (2004-01-23 23:07:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops... turns out this is medical equipment. You should have said so, Tikimayer :)

CT = computer tomograph; MR = magnetic resonance

I think you can just replace \'hot body\' with \'colour\'. The thermal colour scale is presumably the default (and maybe the only) one, so for an MR image it is *the colour*.

invguy
Bulgaria
Local time: 05:12
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
PRO pts in pair: 59
Grading comment
Thank you very much, the explanation was very useful. I would have liked to award points to both of you. Harry's link helped me a lot. But I finally decided to translate by "Farbe" and give an explanation in one instance. Sorry, I didn't make it clearer that this relatetd to radiation oncology and imaging options.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Harry Bornemann: Thanks, you think it is this?: http://uni-schule.san-ev.de/space/zukunft_schule/tabelle/glu...
26 mins
  -> Might be... What's in your link is rather a list of samples, not a *colour range*, and doesn't go up to white, yet I think Glühfarben(wert) sounds good. (I'm not a German native speaker, though.)
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Farbtemperatur


Explanation:
The thermal color scale (or ' Hot Body ' color scale) is the most natural looking and most easily interpreted color scale (other than the gray scale ). ...

Wichtige "Kleinigkeiten" wie Graustufe , Farbtemperatur , Farbtreue, Kontrast, Helligkeit, Strombedarf, Blickwinkel, Bedienungsfreundlichkeit oder ...


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Note added at 23 hrs 51 mins (2004-01-23 23:25:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I change my proposal to Glühfarben:

http://uni-schule.san-ev.de/space/zukunft_schule/tabelle/glu...

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Note added at 23 hrs 56 mins (2004-01-23 23:31:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

But the value of a Glühfarbe is a Farbtemperatur.


    Reference: http://www.dooyoo.de/computer/tft_monitore/sony_x202/835294/
    Reference: http://www.nist.gov/lispix/imlab/flsclr/fcolor.html
Harry Bornemann
Mexico
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 758

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  invguy: Your first link contains excellent explanaions, but the second one is not relevant. Please see my answer (not enough place here).
22 hrs
  -> Thanks, changed to Glühfarben
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