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nasal vs non-nasal pronunciation

Greek translation: kolymbo, antika, pangaki

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19:47 Jan 17, 2004
English to Greek translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: nasal vs non-nasal pronunciation
May I have your input about the nasal vs non-nasal pronunciation of the Greek words for:

1) swim: kolybo? kolymbo?
2) antique: adika? andika?
3) bench: pagaki? pangaki?

I have heard both kinds of pronunciation, is there a "wrong" one and a "right" one? A standard and a non-standard?

Thank you all!
Scott
Greek translation:kolymbo, antika, pangaki
Explanation:
1) kolymbo the sound of "m" must be heard, like "mambo"
2) antika a clear "t" like 'antique", is not a greek word anyway
3) pangaki the sound of "n" must be heard, like "tango"

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Note added at 30 mins (2004-01-17 20:17:38 GMT)
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plyntirio

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Note added at 33 mins (2004-01-17 20:20:49 GMT)
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aggeliki

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Note added at 3 hrs 14 mins (2004-01-17 23:01:41 GMT)
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Synopsis of the conclusions of the decisions of
the general assembly of Hellenic Plus Juncture Organization.


The examples of kolymbo, antika, pangaki are valid.

Angeliki/Angela as \"Angola\"

Plyndirio as \"perpendicular\"
Selected response from:

Costas Zannis
Local time: 15:36
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +11kolymbo, antika, pangaki
Costas Zannis
5 +11Kolymbo, Antika, Pangaki, Angeliki/Angela, PlyndirioDaphne b
4 +1kolymbo, antika, pagakianthi
5see my answer
Vicky Papaprodromou


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
see my answer


Explanation:
I would suggest:

kolim'po
an'tika
pa'gaki




Vicky Papaprodromou
Greece
Local time: 15:36
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 3292
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
kolymbo, antika, pagaki


Explanation:
In greek there is no distinction between nt,nd and d (written always as nt in greek) or mp, mb and b (written always as mp)in the pronunciation. Nevertheless there is a "correct" way to pronounce the combination of these letters: If the word is borrowed from a foreign language we keep the original pronunciation, e.g. bota for boot, antika for antique, while for greek words we pefer nd or mb. So, I would suggest kolymbo, antika, pagaki

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Note added at 2004-01-17 20:59:07 (GMT)
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According to what I said before, since it\'s a greek word I would say \"plyndirio\"

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Note added at 2004-01-17 21:04:45 (GMT)
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and Angela

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Note added at 2004-01-17 21:13:42 (GMT)
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http://sfr.ee.teiath.gr/htmSELIDES/TechnologyOrogramma/Orogr...

anthi
Local time: 15:36
Native speaker of: Greek
PRO pts in pair: 107

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxZoi Siapanta: It's obvious you meant "pangaki", though.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, yes, although on a second thought, which is the origin of the word "πάγκος"?
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
Kolymbo, Antika, Pangaki, Angeliki/Angela, Plyndirio


Explanation:
I agree with Costas and Maria. Actually, all should be pronounced in a nasal way. Non-nasal sounds (excluding at the beginning of words) do not or should not exist in Greek, as they didn't exist in Ancient Greek. The non-nasal pronunciation is a result of writing "mp" for both the "b" and "mb" sounds, i.e. we do not have a written distinction as in English, simply because Ancient Greeks knew that all were nasal!
This lack also leads to the opposite problem: foreign words written with a simple "b" or "d" are often erroneously pronounced as nasal, e.g. many Greeks say "Romano ProNDi"!

There is also a very good Greek TV programme called "Omileite Ellinika" (Do you speak Greek?) concerning linguistic matters, where this issue was tackled, and according to it (and the linguists behind it) the correct way to pronounce words with the "mp", "nt" etc. combinations is in a nasal way, unless "mp" is at the beginning of a word or is the transcription of a foreign word/name that does not indicate a nasal sound (see above, Prodi).

Hope this helps

Daphne b
Sweden
Local time: 14:36
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxZoi Siapanta: Absolutely right! They say Romano PronDi, yet they also talk about the iDernet! :-)))
18 mins
  -> Thanks Zoi! The iDernet (!) is a very good example (like the "coButer"!!!) of the opposite

agree  Costas Zannis: Perfect analysis Dafni! I hope at least to help Mr. HaNtzinikolaou :-))
33 mins
  -> Ah, but "hadji" is Turkish, Costas, so it doesn't count!

agree  Nektaria Notaridou
36 mins
  -> Thanks Nektaria

agree  Katerina Kallitsi
49 mins
  -> Thanks Katerina

agree  xxxx-Translator
4 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Georgios Paraskevopoulos
7 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Nadia-Anastasia Fahmi
9 hrs
  -> Thanks Nadia

agree  Ioanna Karamanou
11 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Eftychia Stamatopoulou
19 hrs
  -> Thanks Eftihia

agree  Natassa Iosifidou
1 day16 hrs

agree  Betty Revelioti
2 days19 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
kolymbo, antika, pangaki


Explanation:
1) kolymbo the sound of "m" must be heard, like "mambo"
2) antika a clear "t" like 'antique", is not a greek word anyway
3) pangaki the sound of "n" must be heard, like "tango"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2004-01-17 20:17:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

plyntirio

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2004-01-17 20:20:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

aggeliki

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 14 mins (2004-01-17 23:01:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Synopsis of the conclusions of the decisions of
the general assembly of Hellenic Plus Juncture Organization.


The examples of kolymbo, antika, pangaki are valid.

Angeliki/Angela as \"Angola\"

Plyndirio as \"perpendicular\"


Costas Zannis
Local time: 15:36
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 1656

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Karra: agree with all but "plyntirio"; should be "plin'dirio". (yes, I know you know:) )
12 mins
  -> Έχεις δίκιο Μαρία, είναι δύσκολη αυτή η συνεκφορά Δεν είναι ούτε 'nt' ούτε 'nd" αλλά κάτι μεταξύ των δύο. Nα ακούγεται το "ν" και να μην είναι σκληρό το "ντ". Και δε βρήκα πρόχειρο κάποιο παράδειγμα.

agree  Daphne b: see also below
44 mins

agree  Nektaria Notaridou
1 hr

agree  Katerina Kallitsi
1 hr

agree  Nadia-Anastasia Fahmi
9 hrs

agree  Ioanna Karamanou
12 hrs

agree  Krisztina Lelik
14 hrs

agree  Betty Revelioti
18 hrs

agree  Eftychia Stamatopoulou
20 hrs

agree  Natassa Iosifidou
1 day17 hrs

agree  kalaitzi
2 days1 hr
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Changes made by editors
May 18, 2005 - Changes made by Daphne b:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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