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hendiadys

Greek (Ancient) translation: ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ (HEN DIA DYOIN)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:hendiadys
Greek (Ancient) translation:ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ (HEN DIA DYOIN)
Entered by: xxxIno66
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18:20 May 16, 2003
English to Greek (Ancient) translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: hendiadys
I know the English word is a figure of speech and I know what it means. I think it derives from Greek; what was the original spelling and meaning?
arobsart
s. note:
Explanation:
ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ (HEN DIA DYOIN)

ÅÍ (“hen”, with the aspiration): ONE (neuter)

ÄÉÁ (preposition + genitive): by means of, through, via (cf Latin PER)

ÄÕÏÉÍ: genitive case of dual number of ÄÕÏ (two)

ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ = ONE (concept expressed) BY MEANS OF TWO (nouns connected with “ÊÁÉ”: “and”).


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Note added at 2003-05-16 18:22:33 (GMT)
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HENDIADYS made it into English via Latin, hence the morphological deviation from HEN DIA DYOIN.

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Note added at 2003-05-16 18:23:09 (GMT)
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In Classical Greek and Latin, hendiadys referred exclusively to 2 nouns connected with “and”, where (usually) the second noun was subordinate (i.e. of adjectival value) to the first: L. via et ratio (literally, “way and reason”, i.e. the rational way, the rational method). Nowadays the term is applied to other grammatical categories as well, as in: “nice and warm” (= nicely warm).

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Note added at 2003-05-16 18:24:47 (GMT)
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http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/Figures/H/hendiadys.htm

You can see the spelling with lower-case letters (with diacritics) at the above address. Just do not take their word for the etymology of the spelling... :)

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Note added at 2003-05-16 18:25:41 (GMT)
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A couple more links:

http://latin.gal.ohio-state.edu/composition/hendiadys.htm

http://www.bartleby.com/61/0/H0150000.html
Selected response from:

xxxIno66
Grading comment
That's great! Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3s. note:xxxIno66


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
s. note:


Explanation:
ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ (HEN DIA DYOIN)

ÅÍ (“hen”, with the aspiration): ONE (neuter)

ÄÉÁ (preposition + genitive): by means of, through, via (cf Latin PER)

ÄÕÏÉÍ: genitive case of dual number of ÄÕÏ (two)

ÅÍ ÄÉÁ ÄÕÏÉÍ = ONE (concept expressed) BY MEANS OF TWO (nouns connected with “ÊÁÉ”: “and”).


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-16 18:22:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

HENDIADYS made it into English via Latin, hence the morphological deviation from HEN DIA DYOIN.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-16 18:23:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In Classical Greek and Latin, hendiadys referred exclusively to 2 nouns connected with “and”, where (usually) the second noun was subordinate (i.e. of adjectival value) to the first: L. via et ratio (literally, “way and reason”, i.e. the rational way, the rational method). Nowadays the term is applied to other grammatical categories as well, as in: “nice and warm” (= nicely warm).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-16 18:24:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/Figures/H/hendiadys.htm

You can see the spelling with lower-case letters (with diacritics) at the above address. Just do not take their word for the etymology of the spelling... :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-16 18:25:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A couple more links:

http://latin.gal.ohio-state.edu/composition/hendiadys.htm

http://www.bartleby.com/61/0/H0150000.html

xxxIno66
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 4
Grading comment
That's great! Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
3 mins
  -> Gracias :)

agree  Valentini Mellas
11 mins
  -> Åõ÷áñéóôþ.

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
1 hr
  -> Thanks!
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