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Hebrew translation: baruch haba

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01:06 Jan 18, 2004
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: Welcome
Welcome the visitors
Melinda
Hebrew translation:baruch haba
Explanation:
..

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Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-18 01:27:06 GMT)
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baruch haba - to a man
brucha habaa - to a woman
Bruchim habaim - plural
Selected response from:

Leah Aharoni
Local time: 09:24
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +9baruch haba
Leah Aharoni
5 +1lekabel bivracha et ha'orchimPnina
5 +1Broochim habaimWill Matter
5Barujim HabaimMireia Ferrus
5Kabalat panimxxxAlex Zelkind


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Broochim habaim


Explanation:
+

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Note added at 2004-01-18 01:29:11 (GMT)
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Gave them the plural form because they said \"visitors\" but the singular forms below are also correct. Ma ni shma, L.A. san?

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Note added at 2004-01-18 02:14:17 (GMT)
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Some would also write this as \"Bruchim habaim\" depending on how you wish to transliterate it.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 23:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  anda
8 hrs
  -> toda.
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
welcome
baruch haba


Explanation:
..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-18 01:27:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

baruch haba - to a man
brucha habaa - to a woman
Bruchim habaim - plural

Leah Aharoni
Local time: 09:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michal Circolone
47 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Eugene V
2 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  EdithK
6 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Raphyel: The plural form is the one used in general context,
6 hrs

agree  Yaara Di Segni
10 hrs

agree  Eynat
14 hrs

agree  Yechiel Popper
1 day9 hrs

agree  EGB Translations
5 days

agree  Will Matter
716 days
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Kabalat panim


Explanation:
Keebeil bseiver panim
Kideim bivrakha
Barukh haba

There are many ways to express this in Hebrew. Take your pick :)

xxxAlex Zelkind
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Eynat: That's 'reception', not the verb as asked for.
14 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lekabel bivracha et ha'orchim


Explanation:
lekabel = to welcome
bivracha = with a blessing or a greeting
et ha'orchim = the visitors or the guests

The pronunciation of "ch" here is as the pronunciation of "ch" in the Scottish word "loch".

In Hebrew characters:
לקבל בברכה את האורחים

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Note added at 2004-01-18 10:01:53 (GMT)
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The English noun \"welcome\" is translated into Hebrew as \"kabalat panim\" (reception) or as the blessing: you are welcome, in Hebrew: \"baruch haba\" (when it is said to a man), \"brucha haba\'ah\" (when it is said to a woman), \"bruchim haba\'im\" (when it is said to a group of people).

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Note added at 2004-01-18 17:01:26 (GMT)
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The English verb \"welcome\" is translated into Hebrew as \"lekabel bivracha\". \"Lekabel\" means to receive. \"Bivracha\" means with a blessing or a greeting.
When I wrote it this morning, I have forgotten to write that \"lekabel\" means to receive. Sorry about that. My brain was sleep-deprived after working most of the night.

Pnina
Israel
Local time: 09:24
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  anda
26 mins
  -> Thank you, Anda.
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Barujim Habaim


Explanation:
Barujim :beth-resh-vav-kaf-yud-mem sofit.
Habaim: Hei- beth-alef-yud-mem sofit.

Mireia Ferrus
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: this is also helpful.
2 hrs

disagree  Eynat: The 'j' is wrong in an Anglophone context.
4 hrs
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