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b'sheirt, means soulmate in English

Hebrew translation: בשערט

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00:15 Jan 20, 2007
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
Other / matchmaking term
English term or phrase: b'sheirt, means soulmate in English
I've heard this term, but can't find anyone who knows how to spell it in Hebrew! The above is the best transliteration I could come up with. I know it is also used in Yiddish, but have been told it is a Hebrew word.
Tona Morales-Calkins
Hebrew translation:בשערט
Explanation:
Pronounced, indeed, "besheirt", and means the 'intended' (God-chosen) one for the purpose of marriage, and of course also the soulmate one is looking for for that purpose.

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Note added at 16 hrs (2007-01-20 16:53:59 GMT)
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Some 50 references may be found in Google search, all of them, unfortunately, in Hebrew.
Selected response from:

Doron Greenspan MITI
Israel
Local time: 09:29
Grading comment
Thank you! I liked reading the explanations from all of you. Sorry to have asked for a Yiddish term from Hebrew proz, but I had been incorrectly told it was Hebrew. I am a designer and needed to know the Hebrew letters for inclusion in a design I've been asked to create. Thanks again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2בשערט
Doron Greenspan MITI
4seriously suspect original - or try German side
Ron Armon


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
b'sheirt, means soulmate in english
seriously suspect original - or try German side


Explanation:
I cannot think of anything even close (and Hebrew, though multi-facetted, is not that vast),
But furthermore, there is no philological root I could think of with these letters that could have yealded a term dealing with neither "soul" nor "mate" (even separately).

The best two translations for "soulmate" in Hebrew (see link below), one emphasising the soul, the other the mate are:
Yedid nefesh - ידיד נפש
Nefesh te'oma - נפש תאומה (which litteraly is a "twin soul")
You can see they both use "Nefesh" for soul.
Another word for soul is "Neshama".
They are both used interchangeably and quite frequently nowadays, although "Nefesh" wins in the Bible (654 to 34) and serves there for any living being ("Nefesh Haya") whereas "Neshama" is reserved to humans.

"Mate" would be "Yedid", "Haver", "Re'a" and "Amit".

As I said - nothing using "sh"+"r" +"t" has close enough meaning to be helpfull.

Last hope for your search - I do not speak any Yiddish, but as you probably know it is based on German with a lot of Hebrew mixed into it. If it really has such a term - try looking for it from the german side...

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Note added at 8 hrs (2007-01-20 08:27:25 GMT)
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Bad-style-self-correction - in line 4 "neither" and "nor" should of course be "either" and "or"


    Reference: http://www.babylon.com/definition/soul%20mate/Hebrew
    Reference: http://www.babylon.com/definition/soul/Hebrew
Ron Armon
Israel
Local time: 09:29
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
b'sheirt, means soulmate in english
בשערט


Explanation:
Pronounced, indeed, "besheirt", and means the 'intended' (God-chosen) one for the purpose of marriage, and of course also the soulmate one is looking for for that purpose.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2007-01-20 16:53:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Some 50 references may be found in Google search, all of them, unfortunately, in Hebrew.

Doron Greenspan MITI
Israel
Local time: 09:29
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thank you! I liked reading the explanations from all of you. Sorry to have asked for a Yiddish term from Hebrew proz, but I had been incorrectly told it was Hebrew. I am a designer and needed to know the Hebrew letters for inclusion in a design I've been asked to create. Thanks again!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eynnat
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Eynnat.

agree  Ron Armon: True! I've found it now in quite many ocurrences. It DOES come from Yiddish and its new to me. Thanks Doron! Its great to learn new terms! I'll like this one. I'll start using it.
12 hrs
  -> You're welcome, and I appreciated your explanation above. I thought, this us Yiddish, so there must be an 'Ain' somewhere... and went for Googel.
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