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everlasting

Hebrew translation: Nitzkhi or ein soffi

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03:43 Oct 17, 2002
English to Hebrew translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: everlasting
regular hebrew or more ancient terms for it. All I've found is Olam, which I was told means world.
james
Hebrew translation:Nitzkhi or ein soffi
Explanation:
Nitzkhi - נצחי (male),
nitzkhit - נצחית(female)

ein soffi - אין סופי (male),
ein soffit - אין סופית (female)

Both words can be used to say everlasting in Hebrew.

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Note added at 2002-10-17 05:29:50 (GMT)
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Nitzkhi is more commonly used to say \"everlasting\". ein soffi actually means \"infinite\".
Selected response from:

Suzan
United States
Local time: 20:29
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7Nitzkhi or ein soffi
Suzan
5 +6ad olamJohn Kinory
5'Olam' will not work in this wayxxxY
4Matmid
ashi


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Nitzkhi or ein soffi


Explanation:
Nitzkhi - נצחי (male),
nitzkhit - נצחית(female)

ein soffi - אין סופי (male),
ein soffit - אין סופית (female)

Both words can be used to say everlasting in Hebrew.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 05:29:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nitzkhi is more commonly used to say \"everlasting\". ein soffi actually means \"infinite\".

Suzan
United States
Local time: 20:29
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 84
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ashi
23 mins
  -> Thanks, Ashi :)

agree  Yigal Gideon: Agree with NITzkhi
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Yigal :)

agree  John Kinory: Nitzkhi; NOT ein-sofi
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yoni :)

agree  Sue Goldian: Agree with Yoni and Yigal and Nitzkhi :-)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sue :)

agree  Yaara Di Segni: nitzhi is better in mmost contexts
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yaara :)

agree  liora: Nitzkhi, imho is the best
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Liora :)

agree  xxxY
10 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Matmid


Explanation:
Tamid is forever matmid is perpetual or everlasting

ashi
United States
Local time: 17:29
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Suzan: Ashi, matmid or lehatmid is to persevere or to be persistent/diligent. I have never heard of matmid as everlasting. :-/
13 mins
  -> Tamid is forever. Anything that is Matmid is something that acts perpetually. Lehatmid IS to persevere but Matmid is constant or everlasting in my opinion. I DO like Nitzkhi, though :-)

neutral  John Kinory: matmid is more like persistent - e.g. matmid be-limudav = persisting with his studies.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Yonni
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
ad olam


Explanation:
The expression that uses 'olam' is 'ad olam', sometimes 'le-olam'.

This is a more literary expression, often used in Biblical or liturgical (prayer) contexts.

You are right - oLAM = world. In these idioms, the meaning is that something lasts as long as the world. Literally, they mean something like 'to (the end of) the world'.

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Note added at 2002-10-17 08:31:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way: this is literary, but not THAT literary. Even children use it sometimes. In fact, children are more likely to say

Ani soneh otkha le-olam (I hate you forever)

than any other expression that means \'forever\'.

John Kinory
Local time: 01:29
PRO pts in pair: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sue Goldian: Nice :-)
3 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Yaara Di Segni
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  ashi
5 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Anatrad
5 days

agree  xxxDaniel1
5 days

agree  xxxY
10 days
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10 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
'Olam' will not work in this way


Explanation:
Certainly not in modern Hebrew ('ad olam' is OK).

I'd be careful of the site you mentioned: it's full of mistakes. For example, king is 'melekh' (not 'melek'), and God is 'elohim' (not 'elohiym').

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Note added at 2002-10-27 23:57:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

le-olam is also OK.

xxxY
PRO pts in pair: 4
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