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die

Japanese translation: 死ぬ (shinu)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:die
Japanese translation:死ぬ (shinu)
Entered by: Philip Soldini
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06:44 Mar 29, 2002
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: die
Just interested in the translation of "die" from English to Japanesse.
danny
死ぬ(shinu)
Explanation:
The verb "to die" is 死ぬ (shinu)
As in English, there are a variety of other ways to say this, the most common of which is なくなる (nakunaru): "to pass away."

If you want to know how to tell someone to die (as a threat), you could say 死ね (shine).
Selected response from:

Philip Soldini
Local time: 21:09
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7死ぬ(shinu)
Philip Soldini
4 +1polite vs. objectivenlavender


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
死ぬ(shinu)


Explanation:
The verb "to die" is 死ぬ (shinu)
As in English, there are a variety of other ways to say this, the most common of which is なくなる (nakunaru): "to pass away."

If you want to know how to tell someone to die (as a threat), you could say 死ね (shine).

Philip Soldini
Local time: 21:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 29

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martijn Naarding: Absolutely!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  J_R_Tuladhar: another is "shibou suru".
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. Yes, shibou( suru) means "die" as well, and is commonly used especially when officially reporting deaths, like in the news.

agree  tmmmrt
8 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Katalin Horváth McClure
17 hrs

agree  Yoko Emori: another is 死去(shikyo)
22 hrs

agree  kotobuki
1 day8 hrs

agree  Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.): shinu
3 days20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
polite vs. objective


Explanation:
I might add that although 'shinu' is an appropriate direct translation, in actual usage there are different ways to talk about different occasions of death. Objectively speaking, animals, plants, and people can 'shinu'. But if you are talking to someone about a person that died, particularly an acquaintance of you or your listener's, there might be a tendency to avoid using a term like 'shinu' or 'shibou'--anything with 'shi' (death) in it, and to say instead simply 'naku naru' (亡くなる), which is more soft on the ears. While shinu can be used for humans in an objective way, I don't think 'naku naru' would be commonly used animals, even beloved pets.

nlavender
United States
Local time: 08:09

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yoko Emori
3 hrs
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