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elevator shaft

Japanese translation: 昇降機シャフト

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:elevator shaft
Japanese translation:昇降機シャフト
Entered by: R. A. Stegemann
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13:31 Oct 19, 2002
English to Japanese translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / construction
English term or phrase: elevator shaft
It was a US Jewish real estate developer named Larry Silverstein who was responsible for the building of the former World Trade Center. I have searched in vain to obtain the amount of Japanese investment that went into the construction of those towers. I believe they were completed during Japan's bubble years.

Although I am not an expert on the construction of elevator shafts, is it likely that cold rolled steel was used in their construction?

Are there many Japanese who visited New York when the Twin Towers were still standing, who did not think "Nihon" when they saw them? Did they think anything different than most others, when they were no more?

It is my understanding that Mr. Silverstein has a new blueprint in mind. I even saw a picture of it on the web not so long ago. The new design was much better than the old, and will probably be a far greater challenge to construct. I wonder where the money will come from this time? I wonder how long the new Twin Towers will last?

Ciao,

Hamo
R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 18:19
エレベーターシャフト
Explanation:
"エレベーターシャフト" seems to be okay.

In fact, you can find a lot of examples of "エレベーターシャフト" in Google.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-20 05:45:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I¥'ve just find your additinoal comment. Let me think. The Sino-Japanese version of ¥"エレベーター¥" is ¥"昇降機¥" (shookoo-ki), and that of ¥"シャフト¥" is ¥"軸¥" (jiku). So, the total will be ¥"昇降機軸¥". However, in Google, there is no such example. I presume that older people would prefer this and use it, and it may be just an accident that we cannot find it on the web. But, from a linguistic point of view, Japanese is one of the languages which easily incorporate (or loan) foreign lexical items into its vocabulary. This is quite opposite to the case of Chinese in which everything is going to be translated in the Chinese way. For example, ¥"センター¥" (as in ¥"ショッピングセンター¥") is ¥"中央¥", and that¥'s what the Japanese language does not do normally. This is good in a sense that we don¥'t have to translate each and every single foreign words to Japanese, and, at the same time, it is bad in a sense that many loan words (those that people started recently, in particular) are still Greek to many of the native speakers of Japanese. Until recently, for example, nobody has used ¥"leak¥" as part of Japanese, but, once somebody (I think, in this case, politicians who are concerned with the security of information) started using the word, it has been used widely, and many people are using it without knowing the origin or actual meaning of it. Maybe, Japanese is such a language, and we will have to live with it.
Selected response from:

xxxjsl
Local time: 18:19
Grading comment
Yes, the Japanese language is a very flexible language, but appears threatened by the use of so many loan words. Katakana in large amounts is unaesthetic, don't you think? Thus, I have opted for a combination of Sino-Japanese characters and katakana.

Also, I am wondering if 軸 is the appropriate rendering of the shaft in the term "elevator shaft". The shaft of an elevator is more like a tunnel through which things pass, than it is the center or axis around which things move.

Here is what a quick Google search brought up.
http://www.beec.or.jp/

Then too, one finds the katakana for elevator everywhere in Japan that I have been, and I too good find no google hit for 昇降機シャフト。My word processor handles it quite nicely, however.

As always, thanks for the great input.

And thanks to everyone else for your support.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2エレベーターシャフトxxxjsl


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
エレベーターシャフト


Explanation:
"エレベーターシャフト" seems to be okay.

In fact, you can find a lot of examples of "エレベーターシャフト" in Google.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-20 05:45:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I¥'ve just find your additinoal comment. Let me think. The Sino-Japanese version of ¥"エレベーター¥" is ¥"昇降機¥" (shookoo-ki), and that of ¥"シャフト¥" is ¥"軸¥" (jiku). So, the total will be ¥"昇降機軸¥". However, in Google, there is no such example. I presume that older people would prefer this and use it, and it may be just an accident that we cannot find it on the web. But, from a linguistic point of view, Japanese is one of the languages which easily incorporate (or loan) foreign lexical items into its vocabulary. This is quite opposite to the case of Chinese in which everything is going to be translated in the Chinese way. For example, ¥"センター¥" (as in ¥"ショッピングセンター¥") is ¥"中央¥", and that¥'s what the Japanese language does not do normally. This is good in a sense that we don¥'t have to translate each and every single foreign words to Japanese, and, at the same time, it is bad in a sense that many loan words (those that people started recently, in particular) are still Greek to many of the native speakers of Japanese. Until recently, for example, nobody has used ¥"leak¥" as part of Japanese, but, once somebody (I think, in this case, politicians who are concerned with the security of information) started using the word, it has been used widely, and many people are using it without knowing the origin or actual meaning of it. Maybe, Japanese is such a language, and we will have to live with it.



    model.hirobo.co.jp/parts-list/30-class/ manual/challenge_sa3-7.pdf
    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=%83G%83%8C%83x%81%5B%83%5E%81...
xxxjsl
Local time: 18:19
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Yes, the Japanese language is a very flexible language, but appears threatened by the use of so many loan words. Katakana in large amounts is unaesthetic, don't you think? Thus, I have opted for a combination of Sino-Japanese characters and katakana.

Also, I am wondering if 軸 is the appropriate rendering of the shaft in the term "elevator shaft". The shaft of an elevator is more like a tunnel through which things pass, than it is the center or axis around which things move.

Here is what a quick Google search brought up.
http://www.beec.or.jp/

Then too, one finds the katakana for elevator everywhere in Japan that I have been, and I too good find no google hit for 昇降機シャフト。My word processor handles it quite nicely, however.

As always, thanks for the great input.

And thanks to everyone else for your support.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  yamamoto
7 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  thepooh21
2 days12 hrs
  -> thanks
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