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13:34 Sep 4, 2008
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
Education / Pedagogy
English term or phrase: Teacher
Hi. I'm looking for the proper Japanese term for "most senior teacher" or perhaps "founder." I am a martial artist who has founded a martial art. I want to establish a different term for myself, one beyond "sensei." My rationale has nothing to do with any desire to laud myself. Rather, I want to give the sense of one who is the head of a family or system rather than "just" a teacher. I understand that "soke" might have some relevance to "founder" but I have seen discusison that it really means something else. I understand that "shifu" can be a term for teacher but usually one more associated with Zen. That still might be appropriate. Any assistance on this would be greatly appreciated.
Steven Pearlman
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Summary of answers provided
5 +1師匠madamejuju
5開祖 (kaiso)megunno
4師匠 shisho
Hiroe Rowthorn
4本家本元の創始者(soushisha)/創設者(sousetsusha)
Yumico Tanaka
3 +1師範 (pronounced "shihan")xxxmikey71
4開創者 (kaisou-sha)mplant
4宗主(soushu)Sawako H
3範士transman82
3統率者
Iman Haggag
2 +1創始者/Soushishamuu


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
teacher
師匠


Explanation:
Pronounce it as "sishou". As well as a teacher, it includes the meaning of a person who has an extraordinary skill in artistic hand work. If you have founded some new material, this may suit you.

madamejuju
Local time: 22:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mami Y.
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
teacher
統率者


Explanation:
take command of an army...i think this is a strong meaning as it means "the leader who hold the reins and this leader(in my own point of view" has to be specialized and expertised in a field meaning a knowledgeable person)

Example sentence(s):
  • 軍を統率する。
Iman Haggag
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
teacher
開創者 (kaisou-sha)


Explanation:
師範, or 師匠 could be a title which is only used by his disciples.
I took the question as he is looking for a title which can be accepted by outsiders at the same time. In that case titles like 創始者(soushi-sha) have the required meaning.

But since 創始者 has already been raised, I myself would like to raise another one, "開創者(kaisou-sha)".

The term "開創(kaisou)" was used by 嘉納 治五郎(Kanou Jigorou), the founder of 講道館(Koudoukan).
The reference wikipedia article is quoting a letter from Kanou to a person called Saigou, and in that letter Kanou is using the term "開創(スル)" as the one which could be a translation of the verb 'found'.

創始者 does sound great, but 開創者 also could be a fine option which shows the originality of your martial art.

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Note added at 3時間 (2008-09-04 16:53:13 GMT)
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開創者 and 創始者 have almost the same meaning (=founder).


    Reference: http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E8%A5%BF%E9%83%B7%E5%9B%9B%E9%...
mplant
Japan
Local time: 23:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
teacher
本家本元の創始者(soushisha)/創設者(sousetsusha)


Explanation:
If you want to particularly stress that the person is the origin of the new thought or technique which is now wide spread all over the world and there are many diversified ways that stem from the origin, specifications such as 本家本元の 本流 元流 may be necessary.

If you want to specify that you are thankful for the teacher, you can use 恩師 (onshi).

Yumico Tanaka
Australia
Local time: 00:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in category: 16
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
teacher
範士


Explanation:
this is pronounced han shi. han shi means the highest rank in any of the following, kendo,judo, and bu-do.

transman82
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
teacher
師匠 shisho


Explanation:
This can be used for speaking and writing the both. In this case, 'souritsusha' would sound strange since it is commonly used for describing someone who has established a business (big ones)such as Bill Gates for Microsoft, Richard Branson for Virgin group etc.

Hiroe Rowthorn
Thailand
Local time: 23:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
teacher
開祖 (kaiso)


Explanation:
In martial art tradition, the founder is called 開祖. I googled this term and found Aikido, Karate, Shorinji kenpo, Judo, and many other tradition using this term.
You can use 開祖 (kaiso) as your title, and disciples may call you "大先生"(oo-sensei: great teacher) (ex. Aikido tradition) instead of ”先生” (teacher).

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Note added at 1 day5 hrs (2008-09-05 19:19:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Kaiso means "originator; patriarch (who creates the tradition/organization); progenitor." (The literal meaning of the character "Kai" is "to open," and "So," "ancestor/forefather.") It is a respected term as it is used in Zen tradition as "a founder" as well as in martial arts.

<Translation>
First example: Invincible sword master, Teacher Hibino Raicho, the Jinto school sword art founder (Kaiso).
Second example: Began training with Mabuni Kenwa in Okinawan karate tradition (who becomes later the founder (Kaiso) of Shitoo Karate school); 1929.

Hope this helps clarify. :-)


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Note added at 1 day9 hrs (2008-09-05 22:44:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I misunderstood the expression "respected term".
No. "Kaiso" is not a term that students use to call you. They can refer to you as "Kaiso" when they talk to somebody else, but in face to face situation, they should call you "sensei (teacher)." To differentiate between teachers, they can add individual teacher's name, such as "Pealman sensei." This is customary in Japan. But if you still want different term, there is a term that I suggested earlier: "oo-sensei (great teacher)."

Example sentence(s):
  • 天下無敵 神刀流劍武術開祖日比野雷風先生
  • 首里手・那覇手の摩文仁賢和(後の糸東流開祖)に師事昭和4年(1929年)

    Reference: http://budo.seesaa.net/article/51854644.html
    Reference: http://f38.aaa.livedoor.jp/~ikedonsp/shinntoryu01_postcard.h...
megunno
Local time: 08:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
teacher
創始者/Soushisha


Explanation:
This is a kind of big word widely used to categorize who originally started something that later shows growth in the number of the people who deal with that in different way such as by learning, by being hired, by being influenced, by being fascinated or by being involved, etc...anyway being taken into that structure. That can be a company, school, method, religion of course martial arts. But it doesn't necessarily mean the person who teaches, much sounds like dignified 'the great father".


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Note added at 2日1時間 (2008-09-06 14:55:08 GMT)
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"者/sha" = person, so by 3 it means "the person who originally started to created something"(you probably know "創/sou"=creation, "始/shi"=start), so it exactly represents a founder.
It might not be very suitable to use in intimate relation such as relation between you and a disciple face to face. Although it's not wrong to use this term in any relation, but sure to feel bit formal in intimate relation as this word consists of such explanative combination of 3 characters, then it works well as a title towards outside.

muu
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lunabagels: You can introduce yourself (or students can introduce you to outsiders) as "soushisha (founder)" , but how about "dai-sensei (大先生)" for students to call you casually?
4 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
teacher
宗主(soushu)


Explanation:
宗主 (soushu) means the head of 宗家(souke). Souke means more of a "family" or "group of people" rather than individual. It is also used in martial arts not only other Japanese art, such as florwer arrangement. Although it doesn't necessarily means "founder". For that, you can add 創始者 (soushisha) or 開祖 (kaiso).

師範 means simply an instructor, it is same as Sensei, but used as a given title from organizations, whereas Sensei is used by people when they call them with respect.

I don't think 統率者 is used as a title in the area of martial arts in Japan.

I have been practicing a few different martial arts overseas for over 10 years, so I think this explanation is fairly accurate.

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Note added at 19 hrs (2008-09-05 08:36:34 GMT)
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As for a title that your students will call you as, 宗主 (soushu) will be the one. 創始者 or 開祖 (kaiso: which means "founder") are appropriate for any documents such as brochures.

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Note added at 2 days3 hrs (2008-09-06 17:08:49 GMT)
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First of all, you should generally be called "Sensei 先生" by other instructors and students, while you have another title for document such as an organizational chart, etc. Other instructors can call you "Soushu 宗主" (or "Souke 宗家" as this can be synonym for "Soushu 宗主" ) in staff meeting or other occations if needed be conscious of your position in the organization. "Soushi-sha 創始者" or "Kaiso 開祖" are mostly used in written materials or lecture, but not in recgular conversation to call you.

I think "Hanshi 範士" is used mainly in the martial arts with sword such as Kendo or Iaido, and "Shisho 師匠" is used in dance, music, or other entertainment arts, but not in martial arts.

"Soushi 創始" means to establish or found. "Sha 者" means a person.

"Kaiso 開祖" is pertainining to religion or martial arts, whereas "Soushi-sha 創始者" is more generally used such as any businesses or organizations.



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Note added at 2 days3 hrs (2008-09-06 17:14:38 GMT)
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By the way, "O (or Oh) Sensei" in Aikido only refers to its founder, and it is used almost as a pronoun. This "O" is 翁 which means "old and wise", not 大 which means "great". So for that matter "大先生" is rather ponounced "Dai-sensei", I think. But this sounds too much of putting self-important and not graceful, which I believe you don't want that.

Sawako H
Canada
Local time: 07:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
teacher
師範 (pronounced "shihan")


Explanation:
If you found it yourself, I think "souke" is the term you're looking for.
If its not "souke", then probably the most appropriate word may be "shihan"

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Note added at 9 days (2008-09-14 12:01:17 GMT)
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After reading the supplimental notes, I still think "Shihan" is the best term.

There are lots of comments, but if you are going to be the teacher of "Sensei", the term probably fits the best.

If you really want to be technical. it may be best to make up your own term, English or Japanese, or maybe some other language, and make sure that the word you make up contains the meaning you want to contain.

xxxmikey71
Japan
Local time: 23:53
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jackamano: Souke (宗家) sounds moreabout flower arrangement or tea ceremony. I tink mikey71-san's suggestion is the best.
31 mins
  -> thank you
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