ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » English to Japanese » Other

I love you

Japanese translation: "Suki (da) yo" or "Aishite iru yo"

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
03:58 Jan 22, 2002
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: I love you
I love you.
Jessica
Japanese translation:"Suki (da) yo" or "Aishite iru yo"
Explanation:
Two choices:
1. "Suki (da) yo" (include 'da' for male speech)
好きだよ。

2. "Aishite iru yo"
愛しているよ

"Aishite iru yo" seems more mature, and profound compared to the more casual "suki (da) yo".
Selected response from:

Mike Sickler
Local time: 01:08
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3"Suki (da) yo" or "Aishite iru yo"Mike Sickler
5 +1_______ daisuki!mimichan
4 +1(Watashi wa anata wo) aishite imasuEmi White
5AishiteruEriOW
4koi o shi masupriya narayan


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
"Suki (da) yo" or "Aishite iru yo"


Explanation:
Two choices:
1. "Suki (da) yo" (include 'da' for male speech)
好きだよ。

2. "Aishite iru yo"
愛しているよ

"Aishite iru yo" seems more mature, and profound compared to the more casual "suki (da) yo".

Mike Sickler
Local time: 01:08
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Timothy Takemoto: But aishite iru you seems more sticky and, generally, it is not said much between Japanese lovers, I believe. Or perhaps it is only me.
12 mins

agree  nyasue: Perhaps, the asker is Jessica, she would choose 1.
12 hrs

agree  kotobuki
15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(Watashi wa anata wo) aishite imasu


Explanation:
"Watashi"= I, "anata"=you, "aishite imasu"=LOVE(verv)
Often in Japanese, you can understand each other without using subject or object. So you can just say "Aishite imasu."

According to my dictionary(Taishukan's Genius), you can also say
"(Watashi wa anataga) daisuki desu"

Hope this helped you. Good Luck!


Emi White
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  preeti_k
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
koi o shi masu


Explanation:
it can either be:
koi o shi masu
koi o shitai masu
koi==love

priya narayan
Local time: 21:38
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
_______ daisuki!


Explanation:
What would be the right translation for "I love you" would depend on who you say it to.

Daisuki = I love you. This is something people usually say to someone in the family or good friends.

If you want to say it to someone in your family, just combine the word that means mom, dad...etc and "daisuki"
Okaasan(=Mom) daisuki! = I love you (Mom)
If you want to say I love you to someone else in the family, just replace the words dad, big brother, big sister... etc with mom.
Otousan(=Dad)/Oniichan(=big brother)/Oneechan(=big sister)/Obaachan(grandmother)/Ojiichan(grandfather) "daisuki!"

To a cousin, little sister, little brother, or friends, combine the name of the person and "daisuki": ______ (Name of the person comes inside the blank) daisuki! The name of a person's fiance can also come inside the blank too.

If a person wants to tell a person (she is in love with in a letter,
" ____ (name of the person) no koto ga suki desu."

The translation given by the other answeres are not a mistake at all and are standard translation but it might be good to know that they are not originally a Japanese thing but something literature and movies etc adopted when Japan came into contact with the West.
However, men did say "Kimi ni horeta" or "Kimi ni horeterunda" to women when they loved someone became aggressive. Otherwise Japanese people have uasually said things indirectly to imply to the other person that they loved the other person or said things in a way that the other person would sense it.




mimichan
Local time: 12:08
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  preeti_k
44 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Aishiteru


Explanation:
The exact correct translation of the word, "I love you," would be "Aishite imasu." This is very formal and often used in a written format. I chose "Aishiteru" because this can be used both by male and female and is the very casual word that can be used by two people in a relationship. Japanese people prefer using "suki (yo)" spoken by female or "suki (dayo)" spoken by male instead of actually saying "aishiteru" because the former words indicate less committed feeling of the speaker.

EriOW
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: