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Hana

Japanese translation: はな/ハナ/花

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Hana
Japanese translation:はな/ハナ/花
Entered by: Hirohisa Oda
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15:29 Sep 23, 2003
English to Japanese translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Hana
My name is Hannah, but in japan, my native country, they spell it Hana. I need the spelling for it in japanesse
hannah
はな/ハナ/花
Explanation:
はな hiragana
ハナ katakana
花 character

You could select any of these for your name. Hiragana is often used by women to write their name in because it appears flowing and femine. Katakana might be used because it is used for foreign names. The character might be used to convey the image of a flower pictographically.

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Note added at 2003-09-23 21:56:04 (GMT)
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As Katalin mentioned, since your native country is Japan, you would probably want to write your name in hiragana or kanji.
Selected response from:

Hirohisa Oda
Local time: 14:54
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4はな/ハナ/花Hirohisa Oda
5 +1ハンナ (ハナ)xxxjsl


  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ハンナ (ハナ)


Explanation:
I believe that your name "Hannah" is much better expressed if it is spelled as "ハンナ" (ha-n-na). The reason why many Japanese people call you "hana" is because, in English, your name has two syllables (Han-nah), and they will capture the number of syllables. That's why they call you "Hana". But, I personally believe that "ハンナ" is much better than "ハナ". "hana" in Japanese means "flower", but it also means "nose".


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Note added at 2003-09-23 15:57:32 (GMT)
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If you still prefer ¥"ハナ¥" (hana), it¥'s okay and it¥'s up to you, since some people still prefer ¥"ハナ¥" (hana) in any way. Generally, however, ¥"ハンナ¥" (hanna) is more dominant. An American acress, Daryl Hannah, is called ¥"ダリル・ハンナ¥" (Dariru Hanna), and, in a famous movie, ¥"Hannah and Her Sisters¥", ¥"ハンナ¥" (hanna) is used in its Japanese translation.

xxxjsl
Local time: 06:54
PRO pts in pair: 1002

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  preeti_k
2 hrs
  -> thanks

neutral  Katalin Horváth McClure: She wrote "in Japan, my native country...". If she is Japanese, katakana spelling is unlikely.
5 hrs
  -> Her name is "Hannah", which is not found in Japanese names, and I believe that it is very plausible to give a "general" translation for "Hannah", since it's HER name!
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
はな/ハナ/花


Explanation:
はな hiragana
ハナ katakana
花 character

You could select any of these for your name. Hiragana is often used by women to write their name in because it appears flowing and femine. Katakana might be used because it is used for foreign names. The character might be used to convey the image of a flower pictographically.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-09-23 21:56:04 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Katalin mentioned, since your native country is Japan, you would probably want to write your name in hiragana or kanji.

Hirohisa Oda
Local time: 14:54
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 161
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  preeti_k
2 hrs
  -> preeti_kさん、ありがとう。

agree  Katalin Horváth McClure: If she is Japanese, the hiragana or kanji version is most likely. (She wrote "in Japan, my native country...")
5 hrs
  -> Thank you for your noticing this detail.

agree  xxxKojiTakata
1 day5 hrs
  -> KojiTakataさん。ありがとうございます。

agree  xxxsarahl: hiragana is probably the safest solution -also more feminine and more Japanese
10 days
  -> sarahlさん、ありがとうございます。
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