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Live for the moment

Latin translation: carpe diem

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10:37 Apr 21, 2005
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / art
English term or phrase: Live for the moment
phrase
dave adams
Latin translation:carpe diem
Explanation:
carpe diem
Related: General Literature

(kär´pĕ dç´ĕm) , a descriptive term for literature that urges readers to live for the moment [from the Latin phrase “seize the day,” used by Horace]. The theme, which was widely used in 16th- and 17th-century love poetry, is best exemplified by a familiar stanza from Robert Herrick's “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” :

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying.
Shakespeare's version of the theme takes the following form in Twelfth Night :

What is love? 'Tis not hereafter; Present mirth has present laughter; What's to come is still unsure. In delay there lies no plenty, Then come and kiss me sweet and twenty; Youth's a stuff will not endure.
Selected response from:

Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 17:22
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4carpe diem
Fernando Muela
3 +3vivite temporis momentumxxx------
5CARPE DIEM !!
Anatoliy Babich


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
live for the moment
carpe diem


Explanation:
carpe diem
Related: General Literature

(kär´pĕ dç´ĕm) , a descriptive term for literature that urges readers to live for the moment [from the Latin phrase “seize the day,” used by Horace]. The theme, which was widely used in 16th- and 17th-century love poetry, is best exemplified by a familiar stanza from Robert Herrick's “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” :

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying.
Shakespeare's version of the theme takes the following form in Twelfth Night :

What is love? 'Tis not hereafter; Present mirth has present laughter; What's to come is still unsure. In delay there lies no plenty, Then come and kiss me sweet and twenty; Youth's a stuff will not endure.


Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 17:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Deschant
5 mins
  -> Gracias, Eva

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Vicky

agree  Valentini Mellas
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Linnea16
5 days
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
live for the moment
CARPE DIEM !!


Explanation:
"CARPE DIEM" (live for the moment, literally "seize the day")

Anatoliy Babich
Ukraine
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
live for the moment
vivite temporis momentum


Explanation:
:)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 30 mins (2005-04-21 11:08:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I possibly misunderstood your question. For me there is a difference between \"to live here and now\" and \"to seize the day\". Carpe diem and seize the day means to get most out of the day, it implies a retrospective view. I understand \"to live for the moment\" as to enjoy the present without past or future.

xxx------
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Exactly... :-) Cheers, Janfri!
2 mins
  -> Thank you Vicky! I understand that carpe diem is stoic and "live for the moment" has an epicurean sense. :o:)

agree  Kirill Semenov: true, my first thought also was "live here and now" :) Also I would consider "vivere"
36 mins
  -> Thank you Kirill. Yes, "vivere temporis momentum" is probably the better solution.

agree  verbis
12 days
  -> ¡Grazie, verbis!
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